Sacred Sunday: 13th Century Stained Glass (Romanesque and Gothic) – Part 2 of 2

Window 1247-50 Stained glass window Cathedral, Troyes

Window
1247-50
Stained glass window
Cathedral, Troyes

The full-color glazing of the choir of Troyes Cathedral shows each frame divided horizontally into three areas filled with scenes or figures, framed by painted architecture or a kind of extended foil.

The technique of combining large area of grisaille glass in which the figures are set as a horizontal band of color was further elaborated in the collegiate church of St.-Urbain in Troyes, and became predominant in the stained glass of French building until the mid-14th century.

Jacob with the Tree of Jesse c. 1218 Stained glass window Cathedral, Freiburg

Jacob with the Tree of Jesse
c. 1218
Stained glass window
Cathedral, Freiburg

This fragment of a stained glass window is from the late Romanesque minster in Freiburg im Breisgau. In 1509 it was transferred to the Late Gothic choir and afterwards into the window of the facade of the south transept.

The patriarch Jacob, who in his left hand holds a tablet bearing his name and in his right hand the ladder of heaven, came from a genealogy of Christ, in other word the Tree of Jesse.

The Stigmatization of St Francis 1235-45 Stained glass window Barfüsserkirche, Erfurt

The Stigmatization of St Francis
1235-45
Stained glass window
Barfüsserkirche, Erfurt

St Francis of Assisi has originally emphasized the vow of poverty, but within decades of the founding of the Franciscan order in 1209, Franciscan churches much farther afield, like that at Erfurt in Germany, contained lavish stained glass images, including the scene of his receiving the stigmata.

Saints 1250s Stained glass window Cathedral, Naumburg

Saints
1250s
Stained glass window
Cathedral, Naumburg

Stained glass windows were created in the Naumburg cathedral in the 1250s, in the same period when the Naumburg Master, probably the greatest German sculptor of the Gothic age, created there his outstanding works of sculpture. His idiom was based on the style of Early High Gothic works of art in the eastern provinces of France, such as in Reims. From him the glass painters took over the treatment of figures, but integrated them into their own style.

The two saints shown in the picture are Sebastian (left) and Magdalen (right). The figure of Sebastian is framed by an extended foil which consists of two quatrefoils run into each other, backed by a rich tapestry pattern. This type of composition was very popular in 13th-century German and Austrian stained glass, enabled the artist to place several standing individual figures above each other within a single frame.

Virgin and Child 1280s Stained glass window Westfälisches Landesmuseum, Cologne

Virgin and Child
1280s
Stained glass window
Westfälisches Landesmuseum, Cologne

This stained glass window is from the former, now demolished Dominican convent of St Gertrude, Cologne. It marks the final victory of French High Gothic in the lands along the Rhine.

The Virgin stands beneath a tabernacle. The architectural frame is closed off in the background by a blue tapestry of diaper work and is surrounded by a mainly red patterned ground. At the foot of the elegant Virgin, whose gestures and stance are derived wholly from French models, kneels the Dominican monk Igbrandus. He may have been the donor of the stained glass.

St Gertrude 1280s Stained glass window Westfälisches Landesmuseum, Cologne

St Gertrude
1280s
Stained glass window
Westfälisches Landesmuseum, Cologne

This stained glass window is from the former, now demolished Dominican convent of St Gertrude, Cologne. It marks the final victory of French High Gothic in the lands along the Rhine.

This stained glass window is from the former, now demolished Dominican convent of St Gertrude, Cologne. It marks the final victory of French High Gothic in the lands along the Rhine. Thanks to its close ties with the modern architecture of Cologne and Strasbourg, stained glass adopted the High Gothic idiom sooner than other painting arts, thereby showing the way for future development in painting styles after the end of the 13th century.

The Angel Choir 1270s Staned glass window Cathedral, Lincoln

The Angel Choir
1270s
Staned glass window
Cathedral, Lincoln

Between 1256 and 1280 the choir in Lincoln cathedral was extended eastwards. In the new box-shaped space, the so-called Angel Choir, the reliquary of Bishop Hugo had to be installed in a fitting manner. All the window openings and galleries of the choir are filled with geometrical tracery.

Window 1269 Stained glass window Cathedral, Amiens

Window
1269
Stained glass window
Cathedral, Amiens

In the central window of the choir at Amiens Cathedral the glass painters discovered how to provide tall narrow lancets with stained glass in an aesthetically satisfactory way without having to elongate the figures. This solution also met the requirement for more light in interiors. The windows were given a large area of grisaille glass in which the figures are set as a horizontal band of color.

Window c. 1270 Stained glass window St.-Urbain, Troyes

Window
c. 1270
Stained glass window
St.-Urbain, Troyes

The technique of combining large area of grisaille glass in which the figures are set as a horizontal band of colour was further elaborated in the collegiate church of St.-Urbain in Troyes, and became predominant in the stained glass of French building until the mid-14th century.

Rose Window 1290s Stained glass window Cathedral, Reims

Rose Window
1290s
Stained glass window
Cathedral, Reims

The picture shows the rose window from the central doorway of the west portal of the Cathedral of Notre-Dame, Reims. Stained glass windows in the Reims cathedral are among the most famous produced in the High Middle Ages.

On the Web: Sacred Sunday: 13th Century Stained Glass (Romanesque and Gothic) – Part 1 of 2

Crash

Advertisements