Wednesday Reader: Remembering the RMS Titanic

An iceberg photographed in 1912 bearing an unmistakable mark of black and red paint. It is believed that this is the iceberg that sunk the Titanic.

An iceberg photographed in 1912 bearing an unmistakable mark of black and red paint. It is believed that this is the iceberg that sunk the Titanic.

At 11:40 pm on April 14 1912,the R.M.S Titanic side swipes an iceberg, beginning one of the biggest and most remembered maritime disasters in all history.

The RMS Titanic then...

The RMS Titanic then…

...the RMS Titanic now. Painting by Robert Ballard

…the RMS Titanic now.
Painting by Robert Ballard

April 15th, the Loss of the Titanic…

One hundred and three years ago, the most advanced ship of her time was lost on her maiden voyage. A ship that was called unsinkable, sank in under two hours after hitting an iceberg. This ship is still the subject of conversations today.

The RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early morning of April 15th, 1912 after colliding with an iceberg during her maiden voyage from Southampton, UK to New York City, US. The sinking resulted in the loss of more than 1,500 passengers and crew making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history.

Wreath laying over the Titanic site.

Wreath laying over the Titanic site.

On April 14, 1912, the first-class passengers on the Titanic sat down to a ten-course meal. Hours later, the ship would be at the bottom of the ocean…

04_titanic_meal

When the RMS Titanic struck an iceberg off the coast of Newfoundland. 1,517 people lost their lives out of 2,207 total passengers. As a result, the Coast Guard created the International Ice Patrol to safeguard the seaways between Newfoundland and Greenland in the winter months

Each year, the International Ice Patrol lays a wreath over the crash site in remembrance of this maritime tragedy.

Rest in Peace.

On the Web: Lost Child of the Titanic

Titanic Facts 2015 Anniversary

The Titanic on the Smithsonian Channel

Author Deborah Hopkinson shares three of these stories, revealing in one passenger’s own words, “The most heartrending part of the whole tragedy…”

Crash

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