#WarriorWednesday #MilitaryAppreciationMonth

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A weekly feature with news, history and photos in appreciation of the brave men and women who protect our freedom.

MAM

In 1908, the Navy Nurse Corps is established by Public Law No. 115, though nurses have been volunteering on board Navy ships beforehand.

Navy Nurse Recruiting Poster, issued November 1950. Artwork by Blasingame. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 78844

Navy Nurse Recruiting Poster, issued November 1950. Artwork by Blasingame. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 78844

Navy nurses looking ashore in this early 20th century photograph.

Navy nurses looking ashore in this early 20th century photograph.

USS Relief (AH 1) and some of her nursing staff, March 1921. Principal Chief Nurse J. Beatrice Bowman is standing in the center, 4th from right. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 53047.

USS Relief (AH 1) and some of her nursing staff, March 1921. Principal Chief Nurse J. Beatrice Bowman is standing in the center, 4th from right. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 53047.

Trinidad and Tobago (Oct. 29, 2008) Lt. Cmdr. Kathaleen Sikes, a Navy nurse embarked aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3), listens to a young woman during a routine check-up at a medical clinic at the Couva District Health Facility during the humanitarian/civic assistance mission Continuing Promise (CP) 2008. Kearsarge is the primary platform for the Caribbean phase of CP, an equal-partnership mission involving the United States, Canada, the Netherlands, Brazil, Nicaragua, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Trinidad and Tobago and Guyana.

Trinidad and Tobago (Oct. 29, 2008) Lt. Cmdr. Kathaleen Sikes, a Navy nurse embarked aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3), listens to a young woman during a routine check-up at a medical clinic at the Couva District Health Facility during the humanitarian/civic assistance mission Continuing Promise (CP) 2008. Kearsarge is the primary platform for the Caribbean phase of CP, an equal-partnership mission involving the United States, Canada, the Netherlands, Brazil, Nicaragua, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Trinidad and Tobago and Guyana.

USS Enterprise (CV 6) is commissioned in  May 1938. Notable service during WWII‬ include the Doolittle Raid, the Battle of Midway, the Guadalcanal Campaign, Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, the Battle of the Philippine Sea, the Battle of Leyte Gulf, and the Okinawa Campaign.

USS Enterprise (CV 6) steams toward the Panama Canal on 10 October 1945, while en route to New York to participate in Navy Day celebrations. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

USS Enterprise (CV 6) steams toward the Panama Canal on 10 October 1945, while en route to New York to participate in Navy Day celebrations. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

USS Enterprise (CV 6) F6F Hellcat fighters taxiing forward on the flight deck, during training exercises, 2 July 1943. Another F6F is in flight overhead, with its landing gear and tail hook extended. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

USS Enterprise (CV 6) F6F Hellcat fighters taxiing forward on the flight deck, during training exercises, 2 July 1943. Another F6F is in flight overhead, with its landing gear and tail hook extended. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, October 1942. A Japanese bomb explodes off the port side of USS Enterprise (CV 6) during the action, 26 October 1942. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, October 1942. A Japanese bomb explodes off the port side of USS Enterprise (CV 6) during the action, 26 October 1942. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

USS Enterprise (CV 6) F6F Hellcat fighters taxiing forward on the flight deck, during training exercises, 2 July 1943. Another F6F is in flight overhead, with its landing gear and tail hook extended. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

USS Enterprise (CV 6) F6F Hellcat fighters taxiing forward on the flight deck, during training exercises, 2 July 1943. Another F6F is in flight overhead, with its landing gear and tail hook extended. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

1942, the USS Massachusetts (BB 59) is commissioned. She serves in both the Atlantic and Pacific during World War II, notably participating in Operation Torch, Battle of Leyte Gulf, and the bombing of the Japanese homeland.

USS Massachusetts (BB 59) seen from the after deck of USS Alabama (BB 60), in Casco Bay, Maine, January 1943. The muzzles of Alabama's after 16

USS Massachusetts (BB 59) seen from the after deck of USS Alabama (BB 60), in Casco Bay, Maine, January 1943. The muzzles of Alabama’s after 16″/45 guns are in the foreground. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives, 80-G-K-416 (Color).

USS Massachusetts (BB 59). Underway at 15 knots off Point Wilson, Washington, on 11 July 1944. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 97255.

USS Massachusetts (BB 59). Underway at 15 knots off Point Wilson, Washington, on 11 July 1944. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 97255.

USS Massachusetts (BB 59). View looking forward from the ship's after deck, during a lull in the Battle of Casablanca, 8 November 1942. Note: 16

USS Massachusetts (BB 59). View looking forward from the ship’s after deck, during a lull in the Battle of Casablanca, 8 November 1942. Note: 16″/45 guns of her after turret; 20mm gun at left with “Lead, Dammit, Lead” printed on its shield; FC & FD radar antennas atop her gun directors; two large National Ensigns flying from her masts. Collection of Rear Admiral Clifford Van Hook, 1972. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 84534.

Invasion of North Africa, November 1942. Anti-aircraft fire chases four French fighters away from an American spotting plane, during the early morning hours of the Battle of Casablanca, 8 November 1942. Photographed from the after deck of USS Massachusetts (BB 59). Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives, 80-G-38832.

Invasion of North Africa, November 1942. Anti-aircraft fire chases four French fighters away from an American spotting plane, during the early morning hours of the Battle of Casablanca, 8 November 1942. Photographed from the after deck of USS Massachusetts (BB 59). Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives, 80-G-38832.

1946, USS Philippine Sea (CV 47) is commissioned. During her career, Philippine Sea served first in the Atlantic Ocean and saw several deployments to the Mediterranean Sea as well as a trip to Antarctica as a part of Operation Highjump.

Philippine Sea was not the first choice for the name of this carrier. When the keel was laid, she was the USS Wright named in honor of the Wright Brothers.

National Archives Photo 80-G-439871: USS Philippine Sea (CV 47). Grumman F9F-2 Panther fighters of Fighter Squadrons 111 and 112 (VF-111 & VF-112) parked on the flight deck, forward, during a snowstorm off the Korean coast, 15 November 1950.

National Archives Photo 80-G-439871: USS Philippine Sea (CV 47). Grumman F9F-2 Panther fighters of Fighter Squadrons 111 and 112 (VF-111 & VF-112) parked on the flight deck, forward, during a snowstorm off the Korean coast, 15 November 1950.

USS Philippine Sea (CV 47) passes under the Oakland Bay Bridge as she arrives at San Francisco, California, upon her return from the Korean War zone, circa 9 June 1951. Crewmen on the flight deck are spelling out

USS Philippine Sea (CV 47) passes under the Oakland Bay Bridge as she arrives at San Francisco, California, upon her return from the Korean War zone, circa 9 June 1951. Crewmen on the flight deck are spelling out “CVG 2” in honor of her air group.
Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center (photo # NH 97322).

Members of USS Philippine Sea (CV 47) Ordnance Department pose with decorated 2000-pound bombs, during Korean War operations, 9 March 1951. Messages painted on the bombs are:

Members of USS Philippine Sea (CV 47) Ordnance Department pose with decorated 2000-pound bombs, during Korean War operations, 9 March 1951. Messages painted on the bombs are: “Greetings from PhilCee”; “Happy Easter”; and “Listen! To This One it will Kill you”. Among the planes parked in the background are F4U-4Bs of Fighter Squadron 113 (VF-113).
Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-439895).

A Grumman F9F-2 Panther from Fighter Squadron (VF) 112 on the flight deck of USS Philippine Sea (CV 47), during operations off Korea, circa October 1950. Note spectators on the island walkways. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-420946).

A Grumman F9F-2 Panther from Fighter Squadron (VF) 112 on the flight deck of USS Philippine Sea (CV 47), during operations off Korea, circa October 1950.
Note spectators on the island walkways.
Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-420946).

In 1943, in the Attu Operation, Task Force 16, commanded by Rear Adm. Thomas C. Kinkaid, landed a force of 3,000 U.S. Army troops of the 7th Infantry Division in the cold and the mist of the Aleutians.

Attu Operation, May 1943. Soldiers climb down the side of USS Heywood (APA 6) into landing craft alongside off Attu, 11 May 1943. Note M-1 carbines carried by some of these men. National Archives photograph: 80-G-50770.

Attu Operation, May 1943. Soldiers climb down the side of USS Heywood (APA 6) into landing craft alongside off Attu, 11 May 1943. Note M-1 carbines carried by some of these men. National Archives photograph: 80-G-50770.

Attu Invasion, May 1943. The first American flag to fly over Attu was erected on the conning shield of this abandoned Japanese landing craft, circa 11 May 1943. Note that the boat’s helical propeller and “old fashioned” anchor. U.S. Army Photograph: SC-171525

Attu Invasion, May 1943. The first American flag to fly over Attu was erected on the conning shield of this abandoned Japanese landing craft, circa 11 May 1943. Note that the boat’s helical propeller and “old fashioned” anchor. U.S. Army Photograph: SC-171525

USS Louisville (CA 28) shells Attu, 11 May 1943 View of forward 8” guns in action. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 92382.

USS Louisville (CA 28) shells Attu, 11 May 1943 View of forward 8” guns in action. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 92382.

Massacre Bay, Attu, Aleutian Islands. A PBY-5A “Catalina” patrol bomber takes off on a patrol, circa May 1943, soon after the U.S. recaptured the island. USS Casco (AVP 12) is in the background. Photograph released on 4 June 1953. National Archives photograph: 80-G-65978.

Massacre Bay, Attu, Aleutian Islands. A PBY-5A “Catalina” patrol bomber takes off on a patrol, circa May 1943, soon after the U.S. recaptured the island. USS Casco (AVP 12) is in the background. Photograph released on 4 June 1953. National Archives photograph: 80-G-65978.

Sad news from last night: Academy midshipman killed in Amtrak crash

Emergency personnel gather Wednesday in North Philadelphia at the scene of a deadly train derailment. A midshipman aboard the New York-bound Amtrak train was one of six passengers killed Tuesday night. (Photo: Mel Evans/AP)

Emergency personnel gather Wednesday in North Philadelphia at the scene of a deadly train derailment. A midshipman aboard the New York-bound Amtrak train was one of six passengers killed Tuesday night. (Photo: Mel Evans/AP)

A Naval Academy midshipman was one of the six passengers killed in Tuesday night’s Amtrak crash in north Philadelphia, the school announced Wednesday.

Justin Zemser (pictured with his mother, Susan) and Jim Gaines were among the seven people killed when a New York-bound Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia.

Justin Zemser (pictured with his mother, Susan) and Jim Gaines were among the seven people killed when a New York-bound Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia.

In a speech Wednesday at Annapolis, Navy Secretary Ray Mabus identified him as Midshipman 3rd Class Justin Zemser.

“I know that the brigade and the Navy family is struggling with this, and our thoughts go out to the brigade, family brigade for losing such a crucial member of this institution,” Mabus told the audience of midshipmen.

Midshipman 3rd Class Justin Zemser

Midshipman 3rd Class Justin Zemser

Zemser was on leave and was headed home at the time of the crash. Zemser, a sophomore, was from Rockaway Beach, N.Y. and played sprint football, according to his Navy sports bio.

Thoughts and prayers for the victims as well as their family and friends.

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