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US Military appreciation, history and stories in pictures.

1918, USS President Lincoln is torpedoed and sunk by German submarine, (U 90). 26 lives are lost.

Yeoman Howard A. Himmelwright, who was lost in sinking of USS President Lincoln, May 1918. Photo #USN 103369

Yeoman Howard A. Himmelwright, who was lost in sinking of USS President Lincoln, May 1918.
Photo #USN 103369

Officers of USS President Lincoln. Photo #USN 103271

Officers of USS President Lincoln.
Photo #USN 103271

S.S. President Lincoln underway before World War I. She was later named USS President Lincoln. The vessel built by Harland and Wolff (builders of the Titanic , et al.) and acquired in 1917. Photo #USN 41887

S.S. President Lincoln underway before World War I. She was later named USS President Lincoln. The vessel built by Harland and Wolff (builders of the Titanic , et al.) and acquired in 1917.
Photo #USN 41887

Memorial service for those lost with USS President Lincoln, June 1918. Photo #USN 2760

Memorial service for those lost with USS President Lincoln, June 1918.
Photo #USN 2760

U.S. Navy Sailors and Marines from USS Newark (C 1) and USS Oregon (BB 3) arrive at Peking, China, to protect U.S. and foreign diplomatic legations during the Boxer Rebellion in 1900. They are joined by Sailors and Marines from Britain, France, Russia, Italy and Japan.

Boxer Rebellion, 1900. Colt machine gun (also known as a "potato digger") and crew left at Legation. McCalla Collections. Presented to the Navy Library by Captain Dudley W. Knox, USN, (Retired), 1926.

Boxer Rebellion, 1900. Colt machine gun (also known as a “potato digger”) and crew left at Legation. McCalla Collections. Presented to the Navy Library by Captain Dudley W. Knox, USN, (Retired), 1926.

Boxer Rebellion, 1900. Marines defend Peking Legations. Artwork by John Clymer, USMC. Courtesy of the US Marine Corps History Division, #55.

Boxer Rebellion, 1900. Marines defend Peking Legations. Artwork by John Clymer, USMC. Courtesy of the US Marine Corps History Division, #55.

Troops of the Eight nations alliance of 1900. Left to right: Britain, United States, Australian colonial, British India, Germany, France, Austria-Hungary, Italy, Japan. 1900.

Troops of the Eight nations alliance of 1900. Left to right: Britain, United States, Australian colonial, British India, Germany, France, Austria-Hungary, Italy, Japan. 1900.

Boxer Rebellion, 1900. The kind of guards furnished to Legations by the Chinese Government. McCalla Collections. Presented to the Navy Library by Captain Dudley W. Knox, USN, (Retired), 1926.

Boxer Rebellion, 1900. The kind of guards furnished to Legations by the Chinese Government. McCalla Collections. Presented to the Navy Library by Captain Dudley W. Knox, USN, (Retired), 1926.

1904, the Marine Detachment from USS Brooklyn (ACR 3) lands at Tangiers, Morocco to protect the American Consulate during the dispute between Raisuli and the Sultan Abdelaziz of Morocco.

USS Brooklyn crew and goat Photo #USN 93704

USS Brooklyn crew and goat
Photo #USN 93704

USS Brooklyn (Armored Cruiser No. 3) In New York Harbor during the Spanish-American War victory naval parade, August 1898. Photo #USN 63096

USS Brooklyn (Armored Cruiser No. 3) In New York Harbor during the Spanish-American War victory naval parade, August 1898.
Photo #USN 63096

Berth deck cooks aboard cruiser USS Brooklyn, 1899. Library of Congress

Berth deck cooks aboard cruiser USS Brooklyn, 1899.
Library of Congress

2004, USS Pinckney (DDG 91) is commissioned at Naval Construction Battalion Center, Port Hueneme, Calif. The Arleigh Burke-class destroyer is named for Cook 1st Class William Pinckney, a Navy Cross recipient.

PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 14, 2007) - USS Princeton (CG 59), USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) and USS Pinckney (DDG 91) transit behind the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) during a joint photo exercise marking the conclusion of Valiant Shield 2007 (VS07). The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group (CSG) and embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11 are deployed in the U.S. 7th Fleet. Valiant Shield 2007 was the largest joint exercise in recent history, including 30 ships, more than 280 aircraft, and more than 20,000 service members from the Navy, Marines Corps, Air Force and Coast Guard. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Eduardo Zaragoza

PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 14, 2007) – USS Princeton (CG 59), USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) and USS Pinckney (DDG 91) transit behind the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) during a joint photo exercise marking the conclusion of Valiant Shield 2007 (VS07). The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group (CSG) and embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11 are deployed in the U.S. 7th Fleet. Valiant Shield 2007 was the largest joint exercise in recent history, including 30 ships, more than 280 aircraft, and more than 20,000 service members from the Navy, Marines Corps, Air Force and Coast Guard. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Eduardo Zaragoza

The guided-missile destroyer USS Pinckney (DDG 91) fires its MK-45 5-inch/54-caliber gun during a pre-aim calibration fire (PACFIRE) training exercise. The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is on a routine deployment to the region.
(U.S. Navy Photo)

GULF OF THAILAND: A U.S. Navy MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter lands aboard USS Pinckney (DDG 91) during a crew swap before returning on task in the search and rescue for the missing Malaysian airlines flight MH370. (U.S. Navy Photo)

GULF OF THAILAND: A U.S. Navy MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter lands aboard USS Pinckney (DDG 91) during a crew swap before returning on task in the search and rescue for the missing Malaysian airlines flight MH370.
(U.S. Navy Photo)

INCHEON, Republic of Korea - The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Pinckney (DDG 91) pulls into a lock gate to accommodate for different water levels as the ship makes way to port in Incheon, Republic of Korea. Pinckney is in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eddie Harrison)

INCHEON, Republic of Korea – The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Pinckney (DDG 91) pulls into a lock gate to accommodate for different water levels as the ship makes way to port in Incheon, Republic of Korea. Pinckney is in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eddie Harrison)

The only U.S. carrier lost in the Atlantic during WWII‬, USS Block Island (CVE 21) was torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U-549 in 1944. U-549 was later sunk that night by USS Eugene E. Elmore (DE 686) and USS Ahrens (DE 575).

USS Block Island (CVE 21) after torpedo hits from U-549, 29 May 1944. Image from Task Group 21.11 Serial 0027 Report, copied June 1978.

USS Block Island (CVE 21) after torpedo hits from U-549, 29 May 1944. Image from Task Group 21.11 Serial 0027 Report, copied June 1978.

USS Block Island (CVE 21) underway in the Atlantic, off the mouth of Chesapeake Bay (36-54'N, 75-22'W, course 090) on 15 October 1943. Parked on her flight deck are twelve TBF/TBM Avenger torpedo planes and nine F4F/FM Wildcat fighters. Photographed from a blimp of squadron ZP-14.

USS Block Island (CVE 21) underway in the Atlantic, off the mouth of Chesapeake Bay (36-54’N, 75-22’W, course 090) on 15 October 1943. Parked on her flight deck are twelve TBF/TBM Avenger torpedo planes and nine F4F/FM Wildcat fighters. Photographed from a blimp of squadron ZP-14.

USS Block Island (CVE 21), on trials, circa March 1943. National Archives photograph.

USS Block Island (CVE 21), on trials, circa March 1943. National Archives photograph.

USS Block Island (CVE 21), on trails, March 1943. National Archives photograph.

USS Block Island (CVE 21), on trails, March 1943. National Archives photograph.

A SH-60F Seahawk assigned to Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Five (HS-5) aboard USS John F Kennedy (CV 67) lowers a package on a rescue hoist to ‪#US Navy submarine USS Boise (SSN 764) on May 28, 2002. The Kennedy Battle Group was conducting combat operations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Photographers Mate 1st Class Jim Hampshire:

13

Raising History: Bringing CSS Georgia to the Surface. The Savannah District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is hosting a special lecture this evening at 7 p.m., at the Savannah History Museum.

Here’s a look at what ‪‎US Navy divers, Navy History’s Underwater Archaeology Branch, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Headquarters and other partners are doing to preserve this piece of‪ American and ‪‎Naval History‬.

Archaeologists working for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District, and divers and salvage operations teams from the U.S. Navy, retrieve a 64-square foot section of a Civil War ironclad warship from the bottom of the Savannah River the evening of Nov. 12, 2013.

The South will rise again – just one piece at a time – as U.S. Navy divers from Mobile Diving Salvage Unit (MDSU-2) work to free parts of the Confederate ironclad Georgia from the murky, muddy waters of the Savannah River channel.

The Navy divers will work with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) June 1-July 20 as part of the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project, which will deepen the channel from 42 to 47 feet. Part of that project requires the recovery of the ironclad which lies in the path of future dredging.

MDSU-2 will bring up the ship’s armor systems, steam engine components and all her weapons, including four cannons and as many as 50 projectiles, such as rifle shells or cannon balls.

It is a mission that will highlight the skills of Navy divers – quite befitting since 2015 is the Year of the Military Diver.

Navy Diver 1st Class Pete Kozminsky (right) assists Navy Diver 1st Class Calum Sanders, assigned to Mobile Diving Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2, don a Kirby Morgan 37 dive helmet during diver training at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story, Virginia Beach, Va., May 14 to prepare for an upcoming assignment to salvage CSS Georgia in the Savannah River, Ga., June 1-July 20.

Navy Diver 1st Class Pete Kozminsky (right) assists Navy Diver 1st Class Calum Sanders, assigned to Mobile Diving Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2, don a Kirby Morgan 37 dive helmet during diver training at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story, Virginia Beach, Va., May 14 to prepare for an upcoming assignment to salvage CSS Georgia in the Savannah River, Ga., June 1-July 20.

“This is what we live for; it’s what we do day in and day out. When it comes to mobile diving, salvage, underwater ship husbandry and force protection, these guys are more proficient than any dive team in the Navy right now,” said Chief Warrant Officer Jason Potts, who leads Mobile Diving Salvage Company 23.

They won’t, however, be the only military personnel involved. Once the weapons are brought onshore, Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians from EOD Mobile Unit 6 Shore Detachment King’s Bay, Ga., will assist in the recovery, and Marine Corps EOD techs will get the ordnance to an offsite location.

Overseeing the operation will be civilian archaeologists from the Underwater Archaeology Branch of the Naval History and Heritage Command, which has been tracking CSS Georgia’s progress since its first excavation dive in the fall of 2013.

“The CSS Georgia recovery project is one of the more interesting projects NHHC underwater archaeologists are undertaking,” said UA branch head Robert Neyland, Ph.D. “The Georgia will be the only Confederate ironclad to be recovered and preserved.”

Neyland was among those who attended the “test” excavation in Nov. 2013 and was the project director and chief archaeologist on the recovery team for Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley.

During the 2013 excavation, it was “revealed the wooden hull has been lost over time due to current, erosion and previous salvage activities,” Neyland said, leaving behind “a substantial amount of armor made from railroad iron, cannon, ordnance.”

Other artifacts recovered have revealed a glimpse into the design and operation of the ship as well as life onboard, he added.

Apparently it wasn’t very pleasant.

The Rebel Iron-clad ‘Georgia’ Line engraving published in Harper’s Weekly, 1863, depicting the CSS Georgia, an ironclad floating battery that served in the defenses of Savannah, Georgia. U.S. Naval History & HC Photograph.

The Rebel Iron-clad ‘Georgia’ Line engraving published in Harper’s Weekly, 1863, depicting the CSS Georgia, an ironclad floating battery that served in the defenses of Savannah, Georgia. U.S. Naval History & HC Photograph.

It “was an extremely hostile environment for the crew who had to work in engine rooms under hellish heat and humidity,” Neyland explained. “The discovery of numerous sets of leg irons highlights these harsh conditions that led sailors to desert. The ship never saw action, which also leads one to believe boredom added to the crew’s discomfort.”

Some of those artifacts will be featured during a free lecture the week before the divers begin their work. The lecture was held at 7 p.m. May 28 at the auditorium of the Savannah History Museum, 303 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Savannah, Ga. The guest speakers were two of the lead archaeologists involved in preserving the ship’s artifacts: Steven James, M.A., with Panamerican Consultants, a principal investigator on the project, and Gordon Watts, PhD., of Tidewater Atlantic Research, co-principal investigator.

Topics for the lecture included the ship’s construction, since there are no blueprints on how the ship was built. The lecture also discussed life aboard the ironclad, as well as how the recovered artifacts will be preserved.

The lecture, which was sponsored by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District, was hosted by the Coastal Heritage Society. It was the first of eight public outreach efforts focused on CSS Georgia’s recovery, which is expected to cost the Corps of Engineers up to $14 million. The Corps of Engineers works with the Conservation Research Laboratory at Texas A&M University.

CSS Georgia was built and commissioned in 1863 to protect the river channels below Savannah and Fort Jackson during the Civil War. The ironclad, however, lacked effective locomotion, so she was used mostly as a floating battery. On Dec. 21, 1864, Georgia was scuttled to prevent the ship from falling into the hands of the rapidly advancing Union army led by Gen. William T. Sherman.

After 104 years nestled in the muddy bottom of the Savannah River, the wreck was discovered in 1968 during dredging operations of the channel. Some items were removed during the 1980s. Located on U.S. Navy property, the site was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1987, according to the U.S. Navy’s Supervisor of Salvage and Division (SUPSALV), part of Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA).

When the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project threatened CSS Georgia’s remains, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers stepped in to oversee its excavation under the National Historic Preservation Act. The multi-phase operation began in November 2013 with an initial excavation of a 65-square-foot portion of the upper deck structure with iron to determine the condition of the hull material. From there, a plan to recover and relocate historic artifacts was mapped out, with MDSU-2 providing underwater survey, rigging and topside support.

NHHC’s Underwater Archaeology Branch will validate the redeposit and reburial of sections of the ship below water in a back channel area so it can be preserved and protected should funding later come available to preserve and display CSS Georgia.

“NHHC is the federal owner of the wreck and its artifacts and is working with the USACE-Savannah District and State of Georgia to preserve the ship remains and artifacts and make these available for exhibit and interpretation,” Neyland said. “The NHHC mission fosters United States naval heritage and the lessons learned from that history to the current Navy and the American public.”

On the Web: To follow the CSS Georgia project, visit http://1.usa.gov/1G6S2Hn

Crash

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