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KEY WEST, Fla. (March 21, 2013) Lt. Cmdr. John Hiltz, right wing pilot for the U.S. Navy flight demonstration squadron, the Blue Angels, flies over the Florida Keys during a practice flight demonstration. The Blue Angels are in the Florida Keys to perform at the Naval Air Station Key West Southernmost Air Spectacular March 23-24. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Rachel McMarr)

KEY WEST, Fla. (March 21, 2013) Lt. Cmdr. John Hiltz, right wing pilot for the U.S. Navy flight demonstration squadron, the Blue Angels, flies over the Florida Keys during a practice flight demonstration. The Blue Angels are in the Florida Keys to perform at the Naval Air Station Key West Southernmost Air Spectacular March 23-24. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Rachel McMarr)

A weekly feature honoring the Armed Forces of the United States and its Allies.

Cmdr. James Harmon Ward

Cmdr. James Harmon Ward

1861, while commanding a gunboat flotilla, Commander James Harmon Ward is mortally wounded by a musket ball while aiming the bow gun of his flagship, USS Thomas Freeborn at Mathias Point, Va. He is the first US naval officer casualty of the ‪‎Civil War‬.

Dr. William M. Wood

Dr. William M. Wood

1869, William M. Wood is appointed as the ‪#US Navy‬‘s first surgeon-general and serves until Oct. 25, 1871. President Ulysses S. Grant appointed him Chief U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery prior to this specific appointment.

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Rota, Spain (Nov. 20, 2006) – Adm. Miguel Beltran Bengoechea, Chief of Logistics Support, Spanish Navy, observes Sailors, Marines and Airmen
assigned to U.S. Naval Station Rota during a pass in review in front of Spanish Navy Headquarters. The pass in review was part of the Assumption of Command Ceremony of Rear Adm. Jose Maria Pelluz Alcantud, new Admiral in Chief, Rota Naval Base.

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Glen M. Dennis (RELEASED)

1962, U.S. Naval Facility, Cape Hatteras, N.C., makes the first Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) detection of a Soviet diesel submarine.

A Soviet “Zulu” class diesel attack submarine, photographed during the early 1960s. US Navy Photo.

A Soviet “Zulu” class diesel attack submarine, photographed during the early 1960s. US Navy Photo.

A partially submerged Soviet “Zulu” class diesel attack submarine (ss), photographed during July 1962.  US Navy Photo.

A partially submerged Soviet “Zulu” class diesel attack submarine (ss), photographed during July 1962. US Navy Photo.

Map of Cape Hatteras, 1955. Courtesy of the NOAA Historical Chart Division.

Map of Cape Hatteras, 1955. Courtesy of the NOAA Historical Chart Division.

1950, North Korea invades South Korea, beginning the‪ ‎Korean War‬. Two days later, President Harry S. Truman supports the United Nations call and authorizes U.S. naval and air operations south of the 38th Parallel, Korea.

U.S. Marine Corps HRS-1 helicopters from transport squadron HMR-161 launching from the U.S. escort carrier USS Sicily (CVE 118) during Operation Marlex-5 off the west coast of Korea in the Inchon area, on 1 September 1952. This was the first time that Marine Corps landing forces had moved from ship to shore by helicopter. The HRS-1 nearest to the camera is USN BuNo 127798. Sicily´s Sikorsky HO3S plane guard helicopter is visible aft of the carrier (below HRS-1 127798). Photographer Scott Dyben - Official U.S. Navy photograph

U.S. Marine Corps HRS-1 helicopters from transport squadron HMR-161 launching from the U.S. escort carrier USS Sicily (CVE 118) during Operation Marlex-5 off the west coast of Korea in the Inchon area, on 1 September 1952. This was the first time that Marine Corps landing forces had moved from ship to shore by helicopter. The HRS-1 nearest to the camera is USN BuNo 127798. Sicily´s Sikorsky HO3S plane guard helicopter is visible aft of the carrier (below HRS-1 127798).
Photographer Scott Dyben – Official U.S. Navy photograph

A U.S. Navy F4U-4B Corsair of fighter squadron VF-113 Stingers flies over U.S. ships at Inchon, Korea, Sept. 15, 1950. VF-113 was assigned to Carrier Air Group Eleven (CVG-11) aboard the aircraft carrier USS Philippine Sea (CV 47). The battleship USS Missouri (BB 63) is visible below the Corsair.  Official DoD photo

A U.S. Navy F4U-4B Corsair of fighter squadron VF-113 Stingers flies over U.S. ships at Inchon, Korea, Sept. 15, 1950. VF-113 was assigned to Carrier Air Group Eleven (CVG-11) aboard the aircraft carrier USS Philippine Sea (CV 47). The battleship USS Missouri (BB 63) is visible below the Corsair.
Official DoD photo

A 16-inch salvo from the USS Missouri at Chong Jin, Korea, in effort to cut Northern Korean communications. Chong Jin is only 39 miles from the border of China. October 21, 1950. (Navy) NARA FILE #: 080-G-421049 U.S. Army official Korean War image archive.

A 16-inch salvo from the USS Missouri at Chong Jin, Korea, in effort to cut Northern Korean communications. Chong Jin is only 39 miles from the border of China. October 21, 1950. (Navy) NARA FILE #: 080-G-421049 U.S. Army official Korean War image archive.

An F2H-2 Banshee of fighter squadron VF-11 Red Rippers over Wonsan, North Korea, Oct. 20, 1952.  U.S. Navy photo.

An F2H-2 Banshee of fighter squadron VF-11 Red Rippers over Wonsan, North Korea, Oct. 20, 1952.
U.S. Navy photo.

1952, during the Korean War, aircraft from USS Philippine Sea (CV 47), USS Bon Homme Richard (CV 31), USS Princeton (CV 37), and USS Boxer (CV 21) continue attacks on hydroelectric plants in North Korea from the previous day.

USS Boxer (CV 21) deck launch. Visible rings of vapor encircle a Corsair fighter as it turns up prior to being launched from the USS Boxer for a strike against communist targets in Korea. Hovering to the stern of the aircraft carrier, the every-present helicopter plane guard stands by to assist if any emergency arises. Photograph and caption were released in Washington, D.C., on 20 July 1951. Planes are Vought F4U-4s. Helicopter is a Sikorski HO3S.  US Navy Photo.

USS Boxer (CV 21) deck launch. Visible rings of vapor encircle a Corsair fighter as it turns up prior to being launched from the USS Boxer for a strike against communist targets in Korea. Hovering to the stern of the aircraft carrier, the every-present helicopter plane guard stands by to assist if any emergency arises. Photograph and caption were released in Washington, D.C., on 20 July 1951. Planes are Vought F4U-4s. Helicopter is a Sikorski HO3S.
US Navy Photo.

USS Philippine Sea (CV 47). Lt. Zack Taylor gets ready for a reconnaissance flight over enemy territory, while the carrier was operating off Korea in April 1952. His plane is a Grumman F9F-2P photo version of the Panther jet fighter. Note camera window in the plane's nose, and Lt. Taylor's ribbed crash helmet.  US Navy Photo

USS Philippine Sea (CV 47). Lt. Zack Taylor gets ready for a reconnaissance flight over enemy territory, while the carrier was operating off Korea in April 1952. His plane is a Grumman F9F-2P photo version of the Panther jet fighter. Note camera window in the plane’s nose, and Lt. Taylor’s ribbed crash helmet.
US Navy Photo

USS Princeton (CV 37) scoreboard on the carrier's bridge wing, showing the work done by aircraft of Air Group 19 while embarked on Princeton from 5 December 1950 to 29 May 1951. The photograph was released by Commander Naval Forces Far East under the date of 7 June 1951.  US Navy Photo

USS Princeton (CV 37) scoreboard on the carrier’s bridge wing, showing the work done by aircraft of Air Group 19 while embarked on Princeton from 5 December 1950 to 29 May 1951. The photograph was released by Commander Naval Forces Far East under the date of 7 June 1951.
US Navy Photo

USS Bon Homme Richard (CV 31) anchored in New York Harbor, with supply barges alongside, 9 January 1945. Photographed from a Naval Air Station, New York, aircraft, flying at an altitude of 300 feet.  US Navy Photo

USS Bon Homme Richard (CV 31) anchored in New York Harbor, with supply barges alongside, 9 January 1945. Photographed from a Naval Air Station, New York, aircraft, flying at an altitude of 300 feet.
US Navy Photo

Fleet Adm. Ernest J. King dies at Portsmouth Naval Hospital in New Hampshire in 1956.

Fleet Adm. Ernest J. King. Oil on Canvas 40” x 30” by Raymond P.R. Neilson. Signed and dated by artist, 1951. Painting in the U.S. Naval Academy Museum, Courtesy of the Navy Art Collection

Fleet Adm. Ernest J. King. Oil on Canvas 40” x 30” by Raymond P.R. Neilson. Signed and dated by artist, 1951. Painting in the U.S. Naval Academy Museum, Courtesy of the Navy Art Collection

Fleet Adm. Ernest J. King’s casket guarded by personnel of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps at the time of his funeral 29 June 1956. National Archives Photograph

Fleet Adm. Ernest J. King’s casket guarded by personnel of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps at the time of his funeral 29 June 1956. National Archives Photograph

In 1923, as a young submarine commander, Admiral King received the first of his three Distinguished Service Medals for his contribution in directing the salvaging of the USS S-51.

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(Above) Gold Medal Awarded to Fleet Adm. Ernest J. King by Congress. The award by Congress for his distinguished leadership of the United States Naval forces during World War II. The presentation was made on behalf of the President of the United States by Fleet Adm. William D. Leahy, Chief of Staff to the Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy, at the National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, where Fleet Admiral King was recuperating from a recent illness.

The Gold Medal, awarded by a special act of Congress dated 22 March 1946 was designed by Miss Brenda Putnam, New York sculptress, who was selected by a jury in competition among eminent artists. The medal, which was struck in the United States Mint, will take its place in the historical series of Mint medals dating from the American Revolution and included the first medal by Congress to a Naval hero – John Paul Jones. Credit: US Navy Photograph Collection

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(Above) Last week the Submarine Force Library and Museum unveiled their newest exhibit, the NR-1 Submarine. NR-1 was a research vessel that performed underwater search and recovery and oceanographic missions. In 2002, NR-1 was part of the mission to recover and eventually restore parts of the sunken Civil War ironclad, USS Monitor.

(Pictured: Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert, Joe Courtney, Director of Naval History and Heritage Command, Sam Cox) Submarine Force Museum and USS Nautilus

On the Web: Sub Force Library & Museum – USS Monitor

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