#MilitaryMonday: Georgia Church Sends Over 5 Tons of Oreos to US Troops Serving Overseas

The congregation of Alpharetta First United Methodist Church in Alpharetta, Georgia, donates 5.6 tons of Oreos for troops serving overseas in June 2015. (Photo: Nelson Wilkinson)

The congregation of Alpharetta First United Methodist Church in Alpharetta, Georgia, donates 5.6 tons of Oreos for troops serving overseas in June 2015.
(Photo: Nelson Wilkinson)

A church in Georgia has recently collected over five tons of Oreos, which were shipped overseas to members of the United States Armed Forces.

Alpharetta First United Methodist Church collected 5.6 tons of the beloved cookies in an annual charitable endeavor called “Operation Oreo.” Beth Allain, spokeswoman for Alpharetta UMC, told about the process undergirding Operation Oreo.

“We collect the Oreos during the month of June and conclude Operation Oreo at the patriotic Sunday worship service that is held on the Sunday before July 4. Immediately following that service, we pack up the Oreos,” said Allain.

“The next couple of days we receive cookie donations collected by fellow United Methodist churches in the North Georgia Conference of the UMC. And by that Wednesday, the cookies are sent to the post office. We have already gotten thank you notes and photos of soldiers who received the Oreos this year.”

Allain explained that Operation Oreo began in 2009, directing CP to a letter written by senior pastor Don Martin in that year.

In the letter, Martin recalled a plane trip he had in February of that year wherein he sat next to a young soldier who served in Iraq whose primary mission was defusing bombs.

“‘What did you miss most while you were in Iraq?’ I asked. ‘Oreos, Double Stuf!!!’ was his quick reply,” wrote Martin.

“I told him that I was the senior pastor of the finest Methodist church in all of Christendom and that I would see that ‘Oreos galore’ would be sent to Iraq.”

Allain told CP about the scale of the annual Operation Oreo, how in 2010 they gathered 2,000 packages of Oreos and by 2013 it had spiked to over 6,000.

“Because the cookies come in so many different sized containers, we stopped counting by the package in 2014. By then Operation Oreo had turned into a community — not just church — outreach project, and the packages were just too many to count,” explained Allain.

“We set our goal that year [2014] at 2 tons, but we collected 3.7 tons of the cookies. Our goal this year was 4 tons, and we collected 5.6 tons.”

Alpharetta UMC engages in community outreach for Operation Oreo in several ways, including social media, contacting business and community leaders, putting ads in local papers, and with signs outside their church building.

Operation Oreo has caught the attention of many, with donations coming from several entities, noted the local media news site northfulton.com.

“Congregations at Chamblee, Roswell, North Springs, Mt. Pisgah, Bethelview, Cannon and Simpsonwood United Methodist Churches collected hundreds of packages each,” reported the site.

“In addition, members of Boy Scouts Troop 69 and Cub Scout Pack 459 donated cookies and wrote thank you notes. A note was attached to nearly every package of Oreos sent.”

Operation Oreo is not the only way that Alpharetta UMC helps the troops. According to Allain, the church also supports the Alpharetta Old Soldiers Day Parade and has a ministry centered on helping returning soldiers find civilian employment.

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#MilitaryMonday

Friday: The head of the US Marine Corps confirmed that 10 of its often-problematic stealth F-35B fighter jets are ready for combat. The branch’s own model can take off from warships and aircraft carriers, and land like a helicopter. The program has cost nearly $400 billion and was first kicked off 15 years ago. Photo USMC

Friday: The head of the US Marine Corps confirmed that 10 of its often-problematic stealth F-35B fighter jets are ready for combat. The branch’s own model can take off from warships and aircraft carriers, and land like a helicopter.
The program has cost nearly $400 billion and was first kicked off 15 years ago.
Photo USMC

A weekly feature in appreciation of the US Military and her Allies.

1964, USS Maddox (DD 731) engages three North Vietnamese motor torpedo boats. In the resulting torpedo and gunfire, Maddox hit all the boats, while she was struck only by a single 14.5-millimeter machine gun bullet. Air support arrives from USS Ticonderoga (CVA 14) and her planes strafe the three boats.

USS Maddox (DD 731) oil on canvas by Cmdr. E.J. Fitzgerald, January 1965. It depicts the engagement between USS Maddox (DD 731) and three North Vietnamese motor torpedo boats on 2 August 1964. Official U.S. Navy Photograph.

USS Maddox (DD 731) oil on canvas by Cmdr. E.J. Fitzgerald, January 1965. It depicts the engagement between USS Maddox (DD 731) and three North Vietnamese motor torpedo boats on 2 August 1964. Official U.S. Navy Photograph.

USS Maddox (DD 731) arriving at Pearl Harbor, March 1964. Official US Navy Photo.

USS Maddox (DD 731) arriving at Pearl Harbor, March 1964. Official US Navy Photo.

USS Ticonderoga (CVA 14) A-4 Skyhawk landing on board, after a simulated strike on enemy forces during an operational readiness inspection, 18 January 1963. An A-3B Sky Warrior and F-3 Demon are parked on the carrier's after flight deck, and another A-3 is in the upper left distance, making its landing approach.  Official US Navy Photo.

USS Ticonderoga (CVA 14) A-4 Skyhawk landing on board, after a simulated strike on enemy forces during an operational readiness inspection, 18 January 1963. An A-3B Sky Warrior and F-3 Demon are parked on the carrier’s after flight deck, and another A-3 is in the upper left distance, making its landing approach. Official US Navy Photo.

1921, a high-altitude bombsight, mounted on a gyroscopically stabilized base was successfully tested at Torpedo Station, Yorktown, Va. This test was the first phase of Carl L. Norden’s development of an effective high-altitude bombsight, which became known as the Norden Bombsight.

“Field Instructions and Care” of the Nordon Bombsight. USN Photograph Collection, L-File, Weapons.

“Field Instructions and Care” of the Nordon Bombsight. USN Photograph Collection, L-File, Weapons.

Carl L. Norden is standing alongside the equipment bay of an experimental radio-controlled airplane at the Naval Proving Ground, Dahlgren, Virginia in 1931. Collection of Lt. Cmdr. McLeod, USN/USAAF Photograph Collections

Carl L. Norden is standing alongside the equipment bay of an experimental radio-controlled airplane at the Naval Proving Ground, Dahlgren, Virginia in 1931. Collection of Lt. Cmdr. McLeod, USN/USAAF Photograph Collections

Norden Bombsight. USN Photograph Collection, L-File, Weapons

Norden Bombsight. USN Photograph Collection, L-File, Weapons

1946, President Harry S. Truman approves legislation establishing the Office of Naval Research (ONR), charging ONR to “…plan, foster and encourage scientific research in recognition of its paramount importance as related to the maintenance of future naval power, and the preservation of national security…”

President Harry S. Truman portrait photograph, dated 14 December 1952. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

President Harry S. Truman portrait photograph, dated 14 December 1952. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

(August 14, 2009) - The Office of Naval Research recently conducted tests with a developmental ship hull grooming robot, called the Robotic Hull Bio-inspired Underwater Grooming (HULL BUG) tool. The HULL BUG is similar in concept to a autonomous robotic home vacuum cleaner or lawn mower and incorporates the use of a biofilm detector that utilizes modified fluorometer technology to enable the robot to detect the difference between the clean and unclean surfaces on the hull of a ship.

(August 14, 2009) – The Office of Naval Research recently conducted tests with a developmental ship hull grooming robot, called the Robotic Hull Bio-inspired Underwater Grooming (HULL BUG) tool. The HULL BUG is similar in concept to a autonomous robotic home vacuum cleaner or lawn mower and incorporates the use of a biofilm detector that utilizes modified fluorometer technology to enable the robot to detect the difference between the clean and unclean surfaces on the hull of a ship.

Dahlgren, Va. (Nov. 20, 2008) A Scan Eagle unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) launches from the Navy Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Dahlgren test range. Officials from the Office of Naval Research (ONR), Naval Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC) and various other military commands used the test launch to confirm the Navy Expeditionary Overwatch (NEO) system's ability to deploy a UAV to successfully to detect and engage fictional insurgents. NEO is the collection, integration and demonstration of manned and unmanned engagement systems, platforms, and integrated sensors to enable tactical decision making by agile expeditionary units such as NECC, Special Operations Command and the Marine Corps who conduct distributed operations in both ground and littoral environments. (U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams/Released)

Dahlgren, Va. (Nov. 20, 2008) A Scan Eagle unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) launches from the Navy Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Dahlgren test range. Officials from the Office of Naval Research (ONR), Naval Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC) and various other military commands used the test launch to confirm the Navy Expeditionary Overwatch (NEO) system’s ability to deploy a UAV to successfully to detect and engage fictional insurgents. NEO is the collection, integration and demonstration of manned and unmanned engagement systems, platforms, and integrated sensors to enable tactical decision making by agile expeditionary units such as NECC, Special Operations Command and the Marine Corps who conduct distributed operations in both ground and littoral environments. (U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams/Released)

Yorktown, Va. (November 20, 2009 The Office of Naval Research (ONR) funded Large Vessel Interface Lift-on/Lift-off (LVI Lo/Lo) crane aboard the SS Flickertail State (T-ACS-5) demonstrates container transfers at Naval Weapons Station Yorktown’s Cheatham Annex. The LVI Lo/Lo crane enables the rapid and safe at-sea transfer of standard ISO containers and other heavy loads from military and commercially available ships onto the Sea Base. (U.S. Navy Photo by John F. Williams/Released)

Yorktown, Va. (November 20, 2009 The Office of Naval Research (ONR) funded Large Vessel Interface Lift-on/Lift-off (LVI Lo/Lo) crane aboard the SS Flickertail State (T-ACS-5) demonstrates container transfers at Naval Weapons Station Yorktown’s Cheatham Annex. The LVI Lo/Lo crane enables the rapid and safe at-sea transfer of standard ISO containers and other heavy loads from military and commercially available ships onto the Sea Base. (U.S. Navy Photo by John F. Williams/Released)

“Any man who may be asked in this century what he did to make his life worthwhile, I think can respond with a good deal of pride and satisfaction, ‘I served in the United States Navy,'” – President John F. Kennedy

In 1943, (PT 109), commanded by Lt. j.g. John F. Kennedy, is rammed by the Japanese destroyer, Amagiri, which cuts through the vessel at Blackett Strait near Kolombangara Island. Abandoning ship, Kennedy leads his men to swim to an island some miles away.

Lt. j.g. John F. Kennedy Courtesy John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum.

Lt. j.g. John F. Kennedy
Courtesy John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum.

President John F. Kennedy delivers remarks to assembled officers, midshipmen and their guests at Bancroft Hall at the United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, August 1, 1963

President John F. Kennedy delivers remarks to assembled officers, midshipmen and their guests at Bancroft Hall at the United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, August 1, 1963

Lt. John F. Kennedy with other crewmen onboard USS PT-109, 1943

Lt. John F. Kennedy with other crewmen onboard USS PT-109, 1943

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Crash Course Blog Notes

A number of regular features will be taking an intermittent month off in July because of my cycling schedule. They will return without interruption in August. At the same time, I am for the most part off of social networking for the same reason in July, but hope to post when I can – both in social media and the blog when time permits and when I can’t be quiet about something.

Thanks very much for visiting and for continually reading Crash Course!

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#MilitaryMonday

KEY WEST, Fla. (March 21, 2013) Lt. Cmdr. John Hiltz, right wing pilot for the U.S. Navy flight demonstration squadron, the Blue Angels, flies over the Florida Keys during a practice flight demonstration. The Blue Angels are in the Florida Keys to perform at the Naval Air Station Key West Southernmost Air Spectacular March 23-24. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Rachel McMarr)

KEY WEST, Fla. (March 21, 2013) Lt. Cmdr. John Hiltz, right wing pilot for the U.S. Navy flight demonstration squadron, the Blue Angels, flies over the Florida Keys during a practice flight demonstration. The Blue Angels are in the Florida Keys to perform at the Naval Air Station Key West Southernmost Air Spectacular March 23-24. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Rachel McMarr)

A weekly feature honoring the Armed Forces of the United States and its Allies.

Cmdr. James Harmon Ward

Cmdr. James Harmon Ward

1861, while commanding a gunboat flotilla, Commander James Harmon Ward is mortally wounded by a musket ball while aiming the bow gun of his flagship, USS Thomas Freeborn at Mathias Point, Va. He is the first US naval officer casualty of the ‪‎Civil War‬.

Dr. William M. Wood

Dr. William M. Wood

1869, William M. Wood is appointed as the ‪#US Navy‬‘s first surgeon-general and serves until Oct. 25, 1871. President Ulysses S. Grant appointed him Chief U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery prior to this specific appointment.

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Rota, Spain (Nov. 20, 2006) – Adm. Miguel Beltran Bengoechea, Chief of Logistics Support, Spanish Navy, observes Sailors, Marines and Airmen
assigned to U.S. Naval Station Rota during a pass in review in front of Spanish Navy Headquarters. The pass in review was part of the Assumption of Command Ceremony of Rear Adm. Jose Maria Pelluz Alcantud, new Admiral in Chief, Rota Naval Base.

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Glen M. Dennis (RELEASED)

1962, U.S. Naval Facility, Cape Hatteras, N.C., makes the first Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) detection of a Soviet diesel submarine.

A Soviet “Zulu” class diesel attack submarine, photographed during the early 1960s. US Navy Photo.

A Soviet “Zulu” class diesel attack submarine, photographed during the early 1960s. US Navy Photo.

A partially submerged Soviet “Zulu” class diesel attack submarine (ss), photographed during July 1962.  US Navy Photo.

A partially submerged Soviet “Zulu” class diesel attack submarine (ss), photographed during July 1962. US Navy Photo.

Map of Cape Hatteras, 1955. Courtesy of the NOAA Historical Chart Division.

Map of Cape Hatteras, 1955. Courtesy of the NOAA Historical Chart Division.

1950, North Korea invades South Korea, beginning the‪ ‎Korean War‬. Two days later, President Harry S. Truman supports the United Nations call and authorizes U.S. naval and air operations south of the 38th Parallel, Korea.

U.S. Marine Corps HRS-1 helicopters from transport squadron HMR-161 launching from the U.S. escort carrier USS Sicily (CVE 118) during Operation Marlex-5 off the west coast of Korea in the Inchon area, on 1 September 1952. This was the first time that Marine Corps landing forces had moved from ship to shore by helicopter. The HRS-1 nearest to the camera is USN BuNo 127798. Sicily´s Sikorsky HO3S plane guard helicopter is visible aft of the carrier (below HRS-1 127798). Photographer Scott Dyben - Official U.S. Navy photograph

U.S. Marine Corps HRS-1 helicopters from transport squadron HMR-161 launching from the U.S. escort carrier USS Sicily (CVE 118) during Operation Marlex-5 off the west coast of Korea in the Inchon area, on 1 September 1952. This was the first time that Marine Corps landing forces had moved from ship to shore by helicopter. The HRS-1 nearest to the camera is USN BuNo 127798. Sicily´s Sikorsky HO3S plane guard helicopter is visible aft of the carrier (below HRS-1 127798).
Photographer Scott Dyben – Official U.S. Navy photograph

A U.S. Navy F4U-4B Corsair of fighter squadron VF-113 Stingers flies over U.S. ships at Inchon, Korea, Sept. 15, 1950. VF-113 was assigned to Carrier Air Group Eleven (CVG-11) aboard the aircraft carrier USS Philippine Sea (CV 47). The battleship USS Missouri (BB 63) is visible below the Corsair.  Official DoD photo

A U.S. Navy F4U-4B Corsair of fighter squadron VF-113 Stingers flies over U.S. ships at Inchon, Korea, Sept. 15, 1950. VF-113 was assigned to Carrier Air Group Eleven (CVG-11) aboard the aircraft carrier USS Philippine Sea (CV 47). The battleship USS Missouri (BB 63) is visible below the Corsair.
Official DoD photo

A 16-inch salvo from the USS Missouri at Chong Jin, Korea, in effort to cut Northern Korean communications. Chong Jin is only 39 miles from the border of China. October 21, 1950. (Navy) NARA FILE #: 080-G-421049 U.S. Army official Korean War image archive.

A 16-inch salvo from the USS Missouri at Chong Jin, Korea, in effort to cut Northern Korean communications. Chong Jin is only 39 miles from the border of China. October 21, 1950. (Navy) NARA FILE #: 080-G-421049 U.S. Army official Korean War image archive.

An F2H-2 Banshee of fighter squadron VF-11 Red Rippers over Wonsan, North Korea, Oct. 20, 1952.  U.S. Navy photo.

An F2H-2 Banshee of fighter squadron VF-11 Red Rippers over Wonsan, North Korea, Oct. 20, 1952.
U.S. Navy photo.

1952, during the Korean War, aircraft from USS Philippine Sea (CV 47), USS Bon Homme Richard (CV 31), USS Princeton (CV 37), and USS Boxer (CV 21) continue attacks on hydroelectric plants in North Korea from the previous day.

USS Boxer (CV 21) deck launch. Visible rings of vapor encircle a Corsair fighter as it turns up prior to being launched from the USS Boxer for a strike against communist targets in Korea. Hovering to the stern of the aircraft carrier, the every-present helicopter plane guard stands by to assist if any emergency arises. Photograph and caption were released in Washington, D.C., on 20 July 1951. Planes are Vought F4U-4s. Helicopter is a Sikorski HO3S.  US Navy Photo.

USS Boxer (CV 21) deck launch. Visible rings of vapor encircle a Corsair fighter as it turns up prior to being launched from the USS Boxer for a strike against communist targets in Korea. Hovering to the stern of the aircraft carrier, the every-present helicopter plane guard stands by to assist if any emergency arises. Photograph and caption were released in Washington, D.C., on 20 July 1951. Planes are Vought F4U-4s. Helicopter is a Sikorski HO3S.
US Navy Photo.

USS Philippine Sea (CV 47). Lt. Zack Taylor gets ready for a reconnaissance flight over enemy territory, while the carrier was operating off Korea in April 1952. His plane is a Grumman F9F-2P photo version of the Panther jet fighter. Note camera window in the plane's nose, and Lt. Taylor's ribbed crash helmet.  US Navy Photo

USS Philippine Sea (CV 47). Lt. Zack Taylor gets ready for a reconnaissance flight over enemy territory, while the carrier was operating off Korea in April 1952. His plane is a Grumman F9F-2P photo version of the Panther jet fighter. Note camera window in the plane’s nose, and Lt. Taylor’s ribbed crash helmet.
US Navy Photo

USS Princeton (CV 37) scoreboard on the carrier's bridge wing, showing the work done by aircraft of Air Group 19 while embarked on Princeton from 5 December 1950 to 29 May 1951. The photograph was released by Commander Naval Forces Far East under the date of 7 June 1951.  US Navy Photo

USS Princeton (CV 37) scoreboard on the carrier’s bridge wing, showing the work done by aircraft of Air Group 19 while embarked on Princeton from 5 December 1950 to 29 May 1951. The photograph was released by Commander Naval Forces Far East under the date of 7 June 1951.
US Navy Photo

USS Bon Homme Richard (CV 31) anchored in New York Harbor, with supply barges alongside, 9 January 1945. Photographed from a Naval Air Station, New York, aircraft, flying at an altitude of 300 feet.  US Navy Photo

USS Bon Homme Richard (CV 31) anchored in New York Harbor, with supply barges alongside, 9 January 1945. Photographed from a Naval Air Station, New York, aircraft, flying at an altitude of 300 feet.
US Navy Photo

Fleet Adm. Ernest J. King dies at Portsmouth Naval Hospital in New Hampshire in 1956.

Fleet Adm. Ernest J. King. Oil on Canvas 40” x 30” by Raymond P.R. Neilson. Signed and dated by artist, 1951. Painting in the U.S. Naval Academy Museum, Courtesy of the Navy Art Collection

Fleet Adm. Ernest J. King. Oil on Canvas 40” x 30” by Raymond P.R. Neilson. Signed and dated by artist, 1951. Painting in the U.S. Naval Academy Museum, Courtesy of the Navy Art Collection

Fleet Adm. Ernest J. King’s casket guarded by personnel of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps at the time of his funeral 29 June 1956. National Archives Photograph

Fleet Adm. Ernest J. King’s casket guarded by personnel of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps at the time of his funeral 29 June 1956. National Archives Photograph

In 1923, as a young submarine commander, Admiral King received the first of his three Distinguished Service Medals for his contribution in directing the salvaging of the USS S-51.

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(Above) Gold Medal Awarded to Fleet Adm. Ernest J. King by Congress. The award by Congress for his distinguished leadership of the United States Naval forces during World War II. The presentation was made on behalf of the President of the United States by Fleet Adm. William D. Leahy, Chief of Staff to the Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy, at the National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, where Fleet Admiral King was recuperating from a recent illness.

The Gold Medal, awarded by a special act of Congress dated 22 March 1946 was designed by Miss Brenda Putnam, New York sculptress, who was selected by a jury in competition among eminent artists. The medal, which was struck in the United States Mint, will take its place in the historical series of Mint medals dating from the American Revolution and included the first medal by Congress to a Naval hero – John Paul Jones. Credit: US Navy Photograph Collection

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(Above) Last week the Submarine Force Library and Museum unveiled their newest exhibit, the NR-1 Submarine. NR-1 was a research vessel that performed underwater search and recovery and oceanographic missions. In 2002, NR-1 was part of the mission to recover and eventually restore parts of the sunken Civil War ironclad, USS Monitor.

(Pictured: Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert, Joe Courtney, Director of Naval History and Heritage Command, Sam Cox) Submarine Force Museum and USS Nautilus

On the Web: Sub Force Library & Museum – USS Monitor

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#MilitaryMonday

An overhead view of the battleship USS IOWA (BB-61) firing all 15 of its guns (nine 16-inch and six 5-inch) during a target exercise near Vieques Island.  Careful observation of the three main turrets shows the barrels in various states of recoil. Photo: US Navy

An overhead view of the battleship USS IOWA (BB-61) firing all 15 of its guns (nine 16-inch and six 5-inch) during a target exercise near Vieques Island. Careful observation of the three main turrets shows the barrels in various states of recoil.
Photo: US Navy

A weekly feature honoring the armed forces of the United States and its Allies.

1898, the cruiser Charleston (C 2) captures the island of Guam, its Spanish colonial government unaware that their country is at war with the United States. The island was taken by the United States without incident and the Charleston went down in history as the ship that raised the American flag on Guam.

USS Charleston at Hong Kong, 1898. Credit: US Navy

USS Charleston at Hong Kong, 1898.
Credit: US Navy

An undated photo shows Sailors of USS Charleston (C 2) manning one of the ship's guns during the Spanish-American War.  U.S. Navy photo

An undated photo shows Sailors of USS Charleston (C 2) manning one of the ship’s guns during the Spanish-American War.
U.S. Navy photo

Charleston at Manila. US Navy photo

Charleston at Manila.
US Navy photo

The US Navy’s Last Ships

I talk a lot about US Navy’s firsts and there have been A LOT, but with the TNT premiere of The Last Ship on Sunday night, I thought I’d pay homage to Navy’s “lasts!”

  • The LAST SHIP in commission from the War of 1812: USS Constitution. Currently, the world’s oldest commissioned warship afloat is undergoing restoration, but it’s still open for visitors.
BOSTON (Aug. 29, 2014) USS Constitution sets sail in Boston Harbor during the ship's second and final chief petty officer heritage week underway demonstration of 2014. More than 150 chief petty officer selects and mentors assisted the crew of Constitution with setting the ship's three topsails during the underway to conclude a week of sail training aboard Old Ironsides. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Victoria Kinney)

BOSTON (Aug. 29, 2014) USS Constitution sets sail in Boston Harbor during the ship’s second and final chief petty officer heritage week underway demonstration of 2014. More than 150 chief petty officer selects and mentors assisted the crew of Constitution with setting the ship’s three topsails during the underway to conclude a week of sail training aboard Old Ironsides. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Victoria Kinney)

  • The LAST SHIP commissioned as a battleship: USS Wisconsin (BB 64). While it’s true USS Missouri (BB 63) was the last battleship in commission, Wisconsin, was not only the last of the four commissioned Iowa-class battlewagons to be commissioned when they were first built, she was the last of the four to be recommissioned for service in the late 80s and early 90s.  She was decommissioned for the final time in 1991 after serving in Desert Storm.
USS Wisconsin (BB-64)  Firing a broadside to port with her 16/50 and 5/38 guns, circa 1988-91.  Official U.S. Navy Photograph.

USS Wisconsin (BB-64) Firing a broadside to port with her 16/50 and 5/38 guns, circa 1988-91. Official U.S. Navy Photograph.

  • The LAST SHIP to sink at the Battle of Midway: USS Yorktown (CV 5). It might be said that by the time Yorktown participated in the Battle of Midway, she was already on borrowed time having fought so valiantly at Coral Sea only three weeks earlier where she sustained significant damage.  But her crew and shipyard workers at Pearl Harbor returned the ship to sea in time for the pivotal Battle of Midway. Yorktown played a key role in the victory that spelled the beginning of the end of Japanese aggression in the Pacific, but as she was repairing damage from the second battle a Japanese sub launched a salvo of torpedoes at her and the accompanying destroyer USS Hamman, which quickly sank.  Yorktown, struck twice by the subs torpedoes and further damaged as the sinking Hamman’s depth charges ignited, remained stubbornly afloat for another 18 hours before finally rolling over and sinking. Yorktown earned three battle stars for her World War II service; two of them being for the significant part she had played in stopping Japanese expansion and turning the tide of the war at Coral Sea and at Midway.
Anchored in Hampton Roads, Virginia, 30 October 1937.  U.S. Navy Photograph.

Anchored in Hampton Roads, Virginia, 30 October 1937. U.S. Navy Photograph.

  • The LAST SHIP of the Oliver Hazard Perry Class to deploy: USS Kauffman (FFG 59).  She was commissioned in February 1987 and left Norfolk for her last deployment in January 2015. After she returns home from serving and protecting her country, she will become the last of the Oliver Hazard Perry class of ships to retire.
NEW YORK (May 25, 2011) The guided-missile frigate USS Kauffman (FFG 59) transits the Hudson River during Fleet Week 2011 parade of ships. Fleet Week has been New York City's celebration of the sea services since 1984. It is an opportunity for citizens of New York and the surrounding tri-state area to meet Sailors, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen, as well as see first-hand, the latest capabilities of today's maritime services. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eric S. Garst)

NEW YORK (May 25, 2011) The guided-missile frigate USS Kauffman (FFG 59) transits the Hudson River during Fleet Week 2011 parade of ships. Fleet Week has been New York City’s celebration of the sea services since 1984. It is an opportunity for citizens of New York and the surrounding tri-state area to meet Sailors, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen, as well as see first-hand, the latest capabilities of today’s maritime services. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eric S. Garst)

  • The LAST SHIP to be named for a Medal of Honor recipient: USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112). Named to honor Lt. Michael Murphy’s heroic actions during Operation Red Wings in Afghanistan, the ship recently returned home from its maiden deployment. The ship and crew of more than 300 Sailors conducted goodwill activities with partner nations and various presence operations such as Oceania Maritime Security Initiative in the Pacific Ocean during its seven month deployment.
  • The LAST SHIP to be commissioned in memory of the sacrifice and loss of 9/11: USS Somerset (LPD 25). Joining her sister ships, USS New York (LPD 21) and USS Arlington (LPD 24), Somerset joined the fleet on March 1, 2014.  Her mission is to embark, transport, and land elements of a landing force for a variety of expeditionary warfare missions.
GULF OF MEXICO (Aug. 19, 2013) The Ingalls-built amphibious transport dock ship Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Somerset (LPD 25) transits the Gulf of Mexico during builder's sea trials. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Huntington Ingalls Industries, Inc. by Steve Blount)

GULF OF MEXICO (Aug. 19, 2013) The Ingalls-built amphibious transport dock ship Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Somerset (LPD 25) transits the Gulf of Mexico during builder’s sea trials. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Huntington Ingalls Industries, Inc. by Steve Blount)

  • The LAST SHIP to test the Navy’s X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstrator (UCAS-D): USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). In August 2014, the X-47B unmanned aircraft conducted its first night time deck handling and taxi tests and completed a series of tests demonstrating its ability to take off, land and fly in the carrier pattern with manned aircraft while maintaining normal flight deck operations.
ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 17, 2014) The Navy's unmanned X-47B launches from the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). The aircraft completed a series of tests demonstrating its ability to operate safely and seamlessly with manned aircraft. (U.S. Navy photo by  Liz Wolter)

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 17, 2014) The Navy’s unmanned X-47B launches from the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). The aircraft completed a series of tests demonstrating its ability to operate safely and seamlessly with manned aircraft. (U.S. Navy photo by Liz Wolter)

  • The LAST SHIP to have Admiral Chester Nimitz as its Commanding Officer: USS Augusta (CA31). In 1933, long before he became Chief of Naval Operations in 1945, he commanded USS Augusta, the flagship of the Asiatic Fleet.
(CA-31)  Anchored in the Hudson River, off New York City, at the time of the Navy Day Fleet Review, circa late October 1945.  Collection of Warren Beltramini, donated by Beryl Beltramini, 2007.  U.S. Navy Historical Collections Photo.

(CA-31) Anchored in the Hudson River, off New York City, at the time of the Navy Day Fleet Review, circa late October 1945. Collection of Warren Beltramini, donated by Beryl Beltramini, 2007. U.S. Navy Historical Collections Photo.

  • The LAST SHIP to launch U.S. Army bombers: USS Hornet (CV 8). Conceived in January 1942 in the wake of the devastating Japanese surprise attack on Oahu, the Doolittle Raid or the “joint Army-Navy bombing project” was to bomb Japanese industrial centers, to inflict both “material and psychological” damage upon the enemy. In the joint operation, 16 Army B-25 Mitchell Bombers launched April 18, 1942 from the deck of Hornet to conductair raids on Tokyo, Yokosuka, Yokohama, Kobe, and Nagoya, against negligible opposition.
“The Tokyo Raid By US Army B-25 Bombers,” April 1942 by John Charles Roach, Oil Painting on Canvas, WWII. (Image courtesy of the U.S. Navy Art Gallery 2012-12-8)

“The Tokyo Raid By US Army B-25 Bombers,” April 1942 by John Charles Roach, Oil Painting on Canvas, WWII. (Image courtesy of the U.S. Navy Art Gallery 2012-12-8)

  • The LAST SHIP to have a treaty signed on its decks: USS Missouri (BB63). Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, signed the Instrument of Surrender as United States Representative, on board USS Missouri on Sept. 2, 1945 thus marking the formal end of World War II.
General Yoshijiro Umezu, Chief of the Army General Staff, signs the Instrument of Surrender on behalf of Japanese Imperial General Headquarters, on board USS Missouri (BB-63), 2 September 1945. Watching from across the table are Lieutenant General Richard K. Sutherland and General of the Army Douglas MacArthur. Representatives of the Allied powers are behind General MacArthur. Photographed from atop Missouri's 16-inch gun turret # 2.  Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

General Yoshijiro Umezu, Chief of the Army General Staff, signs the Instrument of Surrender on behalf of Japanese Imperial General Headquarters, on board USS Missouri (BB-63), 2 September 1945. Watching from across the table are Lieutenant General Richard K. Sutherland and General of the Army Douglas MacArthur. Representatives of the Allied powers are behind General MacArthur. Photographed from atop Missouri’s 16-inch gun turret # 2. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

  • The LAST SHIP to fight in the American Revolution: USS Alliance. On March 10, 1783, more than a month after the Treaty of Paris officially ended the American Revolution, the 36-gun Continental frigate Alliance, commanded by Capt. John Barry, departs Havana with companion ship Due de Lauzun carrying money for Congress. South of Cape Canaveral, Fla., she sights three enemy warships closing in. To protect Due de Lauzen, Barry places Alliance between the vessel and HMS Sybil. After being damaged in battle, Sybil disengages.
USS Alliance

USS Alliance

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#MilitaryMonday

MilMon title image

Military Monday is a weekly feature in appreciation of the armed forces of the United States and its Allies.

1777, the Continental Congress adopts the design of the present U.S. flag. Journal entry reads: “Resolved, that the Flag of the thirteen United States shall be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the Union be thirteen stars, white on a blue field, representing a new constellation.”

The ‪‎US Navy‬ played a key role in our flag’s history: http://go.usa.gov/3EqJA

“140th Flag Day, 1777-1917”. Color lithograph shows a man raising the American flag, with a minuteman cheering and an eagle flying above. 'Tis the Star Spangled Banner, oh, long may it wave, o'er the land of the free and the home of the brave’ Library of Congress photograph

“140th Flag Day, 1777-1917”. Color lithograph shows a man raising the American flag, with a minuteman cheering and an eagle flying above. ‘Tis the Star Spangled Banner, oh, long may it wave, o’er the land of the free and the home of the brave’ Library of Congress photograph

The Birth of Old Glory. Artist Percy Morgan, circa 1917. Betsy Ross and two girls showing the U.S. Flag to George Washington and three other men. Library of Congress Photograph

The Birth of Old Glory. Artist Percy Morgan, circa 1917. Betsy Ross and two girls showing the U.S. Flag to George Washington and three other men. Library of Congress Photograph

U.S. Navy Sailors and Morning Colors. U.S. Navy photo

U.S. Navy Sailors and Morning Colors.
U.S. Navy photo

(April 5, 2011) Sailors assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) practice for the San Diego Padres opening day flag ceremony. Approximately 300 volunteers unfurled an 800-pound flag that covered the entire field. Bonhomme Richard is in dry dock for maintenance and upgrades through April. (U.S. Navy photo)

(April 5, 2011) Sailors assigned to the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) practice for the San Diego Padres opening day flag ceremony. Approximately 300 volunteers unfurled an 800-pound flag that covered the entire field. Bonhomme Richard is in dry dock for maintenance and upgrades through April. (U.S. Navy photo)

Pacific Ocean (April 11, 2006) - The American flag flies high as the Utility Landing Craft (LCU 1635) travels to unload excess ammunition off of the amphibious assault ship USS Tarawa (LHA 1). Tarawa is offloading her ammunition to the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), which is preparing for a deployment to the Persian Gulf. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate Airman Apprentice Bryan Niegel

Pacific Ocean (April 11, 2006) – The American flag flies high as the Utility Landing Craft (LCU 1635) travels to unload excess ammunition off of the amphibious assault ship USS Tarawa (LHA 1). Tarawa is offloading her ammunition to the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), which is preparing for a deployment to the Persian Gulf. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate Airman Apprentice Bryan Niegel

1956, USS Canberra is recommissioned as (CAG 2) at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pa. Originally to be named USS Pittsburgh, the ship was renamed to honor the loss of HMAS Canberra during the Battle of Savo Island.

USS Canberra (CAG 2) eight-inch guns of Turret # 2 firing, during a Vietnam War gunfire support mission, March 1967. Note the two outgoing projectiles in the upper right corner. Photographed by Chief Journalist R.D. Moeser.  Official U.S. Navy Photograph.

USS Canberra (CAG 2) eight-inch guns of Turret # 2 firing, during a Vietnam War gunfire support mission, March 1967. Note the two outgoing projectiles in the upper right corner. Photographed by Chief Journalist R.D. Moeser.
Official U.S. Navy Photograph.

USS Canberra (CAG 2) underway on 9 January 1961. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

USS Canberra (CAG 2) underway on 9 January 1961. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

President Dwight D. Eisenhower practicing his golf game, while on board USS Canberra (CAG 2) en route to Bermuda for a conference, 14 March 1957. The driving target and protective netting has been rigged on the main deck, just to starboard of the ship's Number Two eight-inch gun turret.

President Dwight D. Eisenhower practicing his golf game, while on board USS Canberra (CAG 2) en route to Bermuda for a conference, 14 March 1957. The driving target and protective netting has been rigged on the main deck, just to starboard of the ship’s Number Two eight-inch gun turret.

USS Canberra (CAG 2) crewmen sponge out a 8/55 gun of Turret # 2, following Vietnam War bombardment operations, March 1967. Photographed by Chief Journalist R.D. Moeser.  Official U.S. Navy Photograph.

USS Canberra (CAG 2) crewmen sponge out a 8/55 gun of Turret # 2, following Vietnam War bombardment operations, March 1967. Photographed by Chief Journalist R.D. Moeser.
Official U.S. Navy Photograph.

1939, USS Saratoga (CV 3) and USS Kanawha (AO 1) complete a two-day underway refueling test off the coast of southern Calif., demonstrating the feasibility of refueling carriers at sea where bases are not available.

Painting by Walter L. Greene, 1927, depicting the USS Saratoga launching aircraft. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph (# NH 42486-KN). Courtesy of the Navy Art Collection, Washington, DC

Painting by Walter L. Greene, 1927, depicting the USS Saratoga launching aircraft.
U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph (# NH 42486-KN). Courtesy of the Navy Art Collection, Washington, DC

USS Saratoga (CV 3) in the Gaillard Cut (Culebra Cut), Panama Canal, bound for the Pacific, on the morning of 7 February 1928. Naval Aviation Museum

USS Saratoga (CV 3) in the Gaillard Cut (Culebra Cut), Panama Canal, bound for the Pacific, on the morning of 7 February 1928.
Naval Aviation Museum

USS Kanawha (AO 1), probably at Noumea, New Caledonia, as seen from USS Wasp (CV 7) on the eve of the Guadalcanal-Tulagi invasion. Photo is dated 4 August 1942. Other ships present include, at right, USS San Juan (CL 54), an old "flush-deck" destroyer in center, and in the distance a heavy cruiser (left) and a transport (right). U.S. National Archives photo

USS Kanawha (AO 1), probably at Noumea, New Caledonia, as seen from USS Wasp (CV 7) on the eve of the Guadalcanal-Tulagi invasion. Photo is dated 4 August 1942. Other ships present include, at right, USS San Juan (CL 54), an old “flush-deck” destroyer in center, and in the distance a heavy cruiser (left) and a transport (right).
U.S. National Archives photo

USS Kanawha (AO 1), off Mare Island, California, 23 June 1915.  US Navy Photo Collection.

USS Kanawha (AO 1), off Mare Island, California, 23 June 1915. US Navy Photo Collection.

1881, the bark-rigged wooden steamship Jeannette sinks after she is crushed in an Arctic ice pack during the expedition to reach the North Pole through the Bering Strait. She departed in July 1879, entered the Arctic ice in September and is frozen in. The ship is eventually crushed and only 13 of her crew survive out of 33.

USS Jeannette (1879-1881). Composite photograph of the ship, and the officers of her Arctic expedition. Those shown are (clockwise from top center): Lieutenant Commander George W. DeLong, USN, Commanding Officer; Passed Assistant Surgeon James M. Ambler, USN; Chief Engineer George W. Melville, USN; Raymond Lee Newcomb, Naturalist and Astronomer; William Dunbar, Pilot; Jerome J. Collins, Correspondent for the "New York Herald"; Lieutenant John W. Danenhower, USN, Second Officer; and Lieutenant Charles W. Chipp, USN, Executive Officer. Donation of Captain T.S. Wilkinson, USN, 1934. USN Photo Collection.

USS Jeannette (1879-1881). Composite photograph of the ship, and the officers of her Arctic expedition. Those shown are (clockwise from top center): Lieutenant Commander George W. DeLong, USN, Commanding Officer; Passed Assistant Surgeon James M. Ambler, USN; Chief Engineer George W. Melville, USN; Raymond Lee Newcomb, Naturalist and Astronomer; William Dunbar, Pilot; Jerome J. Collins, Correspondent for the “New York Herald”; Lieutenant John W. Danenhower, USN, Second Officer; and Lieutenant Charles W. Chipp, USN, Executive Officer. Donation of Captain T.S. Wilkinson, USN, 1934. USN Photo Collection.

Jeannette Arctic exploring expedition, 1879-1881. "The Sinking of the Jeannette" Engraving by George T. Andrew after a design by M.J. Burns, copied from "The Voyage of the Jeannette ...", Volume II, page 575, edited by Emma DeLong, published in 1884. It depicts USS Jeannette after she was crushed by ice flows north of Siberia on 12 June 1881. She sank in the morning of 13 June in position 77 14'57" N, 154 58'45"E.  USN Photo Collection

Jeannette Arctic exploring expedition, 1879-1881. “The Sinking of the Jeannette” Engraving by George T. Andrew after a design by M.J. Burns, copied from “The Voyage of the Jeannette …”, Volume II, page 575, edited by Emma DeLong, published in 1884. It depicts USS Jeannette after she was crushed by ice flows north of Siberia on 12 June 1881. She sank in the morning of 13 June in position 77 14’57” N, 154 58’45″E.
USN Photo Collection

Jeannette Arctic exploring expedition, 1879-1881. Engraving of the expedition's survivors, based on a photograph taken at Yakutsk, Siberia, in 1882. Those present are (left to right, in front): Lauderback, Bartlett, William Coles, Seaman William F.C. Nindemann, and Mansen. (left to right, in middle): Chief Engineer George W. Melville and Lieutenant John W. Danenhower. (left to right, in back): Raymond Lee Newcomb (naturalist), Seaman Louis P. Noros, Henry Wilson, Tong Sing (cook), Anequin and H.W. Leach.  USN Photo Collection

Jeannette Arctic exploring expedition, 1879-1881. Engraving of the expedition’s survivors, based on a photograph taken at Yakutsk, Siberia, in 1882. Those present are (left to right, in front): Lauderback, Bartlett, William Coles, Seaman William F.C. Nindemann, and Mansen. (left to right, in middle): Chief Engineer George W. Melville and Lieutenant John W. Danenhower. (left to right, in back): Raymond Lee Newcomb (naturalist), Seaman Louis P. Noros, Henry Wilson, Tong Sing (cook), Anequin and H.W. Leach.
USN Photo Collection

Jeannette Arctic exploring expedition, 1879-1881. "Dragging the Boats over the Ice" Engraving by George T. Andrew after a design by M.J. Burns, copied from "The Voyage of the Jeannette ...", Volume II, page 629, edited by Emma DeLong, published in 1884. It depicts the crew of USS Jeannette hauling the ship's boats over the very rough Arctic ice north of Siberia in June-August 1881. Jeannette had been crushed in the ice and sunk on 12-13 June. USN Photo Collection

Jeannette Arctic exploring expedition, 1879-1881. “Dragging the Boats over the Ice” Engraving by George T. Andrew after a design by M.J. Burns, copied from “The Voyage of the Jeannette …”, Volume II, page 629, edited by Emma DeLong, published in 1884. It depicts the crew of USS Jeannette hauling the ship’s boats over the very rough Arctic ice north of Siberia in June-August 1881. Jeannette had been crushed in the ice and sunk on 12-13 June.
USN Photo Collection

1916, USS Pennsylvania (BB 38) is commissioned and is the lead ship of the Pennsylvania class of a U.S. Navy super-dreadnought battleship. During her service to our nation, she received eight battle stars and one Navy Unit Commendation.

Halftone reproduction of a photograph of the interior of the Pennsylvania's (BB 38) wheelhouse, showing a binnacle, steering wheel and an engine order telegraph. Taken circa 1916-1918, it was published in about 1919 by A.M. Simon, 324 E. 23rd St., New York City, as one of ten images in a "Souvenir Folder" concerning Pennsylvania.  USN Photo

Halftone reproduction of a photograph of the interior of the Pennsylvania’s (BB 38) wheelhouse, showing a binnacle, steering wheel and an engine order telegraph. Taken circa 1916-1918, it was published in about 1919 by A.M. Simon, 324 E. 23rd St., New York City, as one of ten images in a “Souvenir Folder” concerning Pennsylvania.
USN Photo

USS Pennsylvania (BB 38) view of the battleship's forward 14/45 guns and her forward superstructure, circa the early 1930s. USN Photo

USS Pennsylvania (BB 38) view of the battleship’s forward 14/45 guns and her forward superstructure, circa the early 1930s.
USN Photo

Humorist Will Rogers with crewmen of USS Pennsylvania (BB 38), on the battleship's after deck, 28 March 1928. USN Photo

Humorist Will Rogers with crewmen of USS Pennsylvania (BB 38), on the battleship’s after deck, 28 March 1928.
USN Photo

Pennsylvania (BB 38) leading two other battleships during maneuvers, during the 1920s. The other ships are two of these three: Colorado (BB 45), Maryland (BB 46) and West Virginia(BB 48). USNHC # NH 63346, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Pennsylvania (BB 38) leading two other battleships during maneuvers, during the 1920s. The other ships are two of these three: Colorado (BB 45), Maryland (BB 46) and West Virginia(BB 48). USNHC # NH 63346, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

June 1948 – The Women’s Armed Forces Integration Act provides for enlistment and appointment of women in the Navy Reserve.

WAVES take the oath. USN Photo.

WAVES take the oath.
USN Photo.

WAVES were first authorized to transfer to the ‪#‎USNavy‬. Pictured Front Row: YNC Wilma Juanita Marchal; YN2 Edna Earl Young; HM1 Ruth Flora. Back Row: AK1 K.L. Langdon, SK2 Frances Teresa Devaney, TE2 Doris Roberta Robertson. Also pictured Capt. Joy B. Hancock, director of the Women’s Reserve, Secretary of the Navy John Sullivan, and Rear Adm. L. Russell, Judge Advocate General. For more Navy Reserve history visit http://navyreservecentennial.com/

1944, one of our nation’s most famous battleships, USS Missouri (BB 63) is commissioned. USS Missouri was the site of the surrender of the Empire of Japan which ended WWII‬.

Surrender of Japan, Tokyo Bay, 2 September 1945  Adm. William F. Halsey and Vice Admiral John S. McCain on board USS Missouri (BB 63) shortly after the conclusion of the surrender ceremonies, 2 September 1945. Collection of Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, USN.

Surrender of Japan, Tokyo Bay, 2 September 1945
Adm. William F. Halsey and Vice Admiral John S. McCain on board USS Missouri (BB 63) shortly after the conclusion of the surrender ceremonies, 2 September 1945. Collection of Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, USN.

USS Missouri (BB 63) Sikorski HO3S-1 helicopter (Bureau # 122527) landing on the forward 16-inch gun turret, during the 1948 Midshipmen's cruise. Guard mail, ships' newspapers and personnel were exchanged via helicopter while the Midshipmen's cruise squadron was at sea. Most exchanges were made by hovering pick-up. The forward turret was used as a landing platform since the floatplane catapults on the ship's fantail prevented helicopters from operating there.  Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

USS Missouri (BB 63) Sikorski HO3S-1 helicopter (Bureau # 122527) landing on the forward 16-inch gun turret, during the 1948 Midshipmen’s cruise. Guard mail, ships’ newspapers and personnel were exchanged via helicopter while the Midshipmen’s cruise squadron was at sea. Most exchanges were made by hovering pick-up. The forward turret was used as a landing platform since the floatplane catapults on the ship’s fantail prevented helicopters from operating there.
Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

USS Missouri (BB-63) ship's crew and midshipmen celebrate the fourth anniversary of V-J Day, during the Midshipmen's cruise, 2 September 1949. They are gathered around the plaque that marks the spot where Japan surrendered on 2 September 1945. Turret Two is trained as it was during the surrender ceremonies.  Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

USS Missouri (BB-63) ship’s crew and midshipmen celebrate the fourth anniversary of V-J Day, during the Midshipmen’s cruise, 2 September 1949. They are gathered around the plaque that marks the spot where Japan surrendered on 2 September 1945. Turret Two is trained as it was during the surrender ceremonies.
Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

USS Missouri (BB 63) in port, circa 1948, with a motor launch full of U.S. Naval Academy Midshipmen passing by in the foreground. U.S. Navy Photo Collection.

USS Missouri (BB 63) in port, circa 1948, with a motor launch full of U.S. Naval Academy Midshipmen passing by in the foreground. U.S. Navy Photo Collection.

For the US Army’s 240th Birthday, here’s one example of One Team operating together: “The Tokyo Raid By the US Army B-25 Bombers,” April 1942 by John Charles Roach, Oil Painting on Canvas, WWII. (Image courtesy of the U.S. Navy Art Gallery 2012-12-8)

25a

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#MilitaryMonday

Military thank you

Military Monday is a weekly feature honoring the Military of the United States and its Allies.

1959, the ‪#US Navy‬ and the US Postal Service deliver the first official missile mail when USS Barbero (SS 317) fires a Regulus I missile with 3,000 letters 100 miles east of Jacksonville, Fla., to Mayport, Fla.

Letter carrier Noble Upperman places the first guided missile letters in his mail bag as other postal officials look on. Postmaster General Arthur E. Summerfield is to the right of Upperman holding the bag. The Regulus Missile fired from USS Barbero (SS-317) landed at Mayport, Florida. US Navy Photo Collection

Letter carrier Noble Upperman places the first guided missile letters in his mail bag as other postal officials look on. Postmaster General Arthur E. Summerfield is to the right of Upperman holding the bag. The Regulus Missile fired from USS Barbero (SS-317) landed at Mayport, Florida. US Navy Photo Collection

Reporters and photographers patiently wait the removal of the first Missile Mail from Regulus. The missile was fired from USS Barbero (SS-317) and landed Mayport, Florida. US Navy Photo Collection

Reporters and photographers patiently wait the removal of the first Missile Mail from Regulus. The missile was fired from USS Barbero (SS-317) and landed Mayport, Florida. US Navy Photo Collection

USS Barbero (SS 317) underway during the late 1950s with Regulus Missile. US Navy Photo Collection.

USS Barbero (SS 317) underway during the late 1950s with Regulus Missile. US Navy Photo Collection.

Philatelic Cover from USS Barbero (SS 317) commemorating the first Missile Mail. The missile was fired from USS Barbero (SS 317) and landed in Mayport, Florida. Courtesy of the National Postal Museum, Smithsonian.

Philatelic Cover from USS Barbero (SS 317) commemorating the first Missile Mail. The missile was fired from USS Barbero (SS 317) and landed in Mayport, Florida. Courtesy of the National Postal Museum, Smithsonian.

1944, the construction of artificial harbors and sheltered anchorages, also known as Mulberries, begins off the Normandy coast. The artificial harbors were required as the Germans continued to control port cities for the most of the remaining month.

Normandy Invasion, June 1944. "Phoenix" caissons being emplaced as breakwaters for a "Mulberry" artificial harbor off the Normandy invasion beaches, 14 June 1944. Photograph credited to SHAEF-OSS. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Normandy Invasion, June 1944. “Phoenix” caissons being emplaced as breakwaters for a “Mulberry” artificial harbor off the Normandy invasion beaches, 14 June 1944. Photograph credited to SHAEF-OSS.
Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

The End of Mulberry "A" Dwight C. Shepler #161 Watercolor, 1944 88-199-FI Below the bluff of the Omaha beachhead, the twisted relic of the fabulous artificial harbor of Mulberry filled the sea. The row of concrete caissons paralleling the shore finally disintegrated on the third day of the great storm of June 19-22, 1944, letting the seas though to break up the floating piers.

The End of Mulberry “A”
Dwight C. Shepler #161
Watercolor, 1944
88-199-FI
Below the bluff of the Omaha beachhead, the twisted relic of the fabulous artificial harbor of Mulberry filled the sea. The row of concrete caissons paralleling the shore finally disintegrated on the third day of the great storm of June 19-22, 1944, letting the seas though to break up the floating piers.

Normandy Invasion, June 1944. "SeaBee" mobile repair shop on a large pontoon, used to support the "Mulberry" artificial harbor off the Normandy beachhead in mid-1944. Note the "USS 'Can-Do'" emblem, tent, quonset hut, tattered U.S. Ensign and Jeep on the pontoon, plus crowd of shipping in the distance. Photograph was released for publication on 27 December 1944, in preparation for the "SeaBees" third anniversary onj 28 December. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Normandy Invasion, June 1944. “SeaBee” mobile repair shop on a large pontoon, used to support the “Mulberry” artificial harbor off the Normandy beachhead in mid-1944. Note the “USS ‘Can-Do'” emblem, tent, quonset hut, tattered U.S. Ensign and Jeep on the pontoon, plus crowd of shipping in the distance. Photograph was released for publication on 27 December 1944, in preparation for the “SeaBees” third anniversary onj 28 December. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Mulberry at Work
Dwight C. Shepler #159
Watercolor, June 1944.

Worth noting: the Royal Navy’s constructors insisted that all planned fastenings and moorings be completed and tested before moving crgo. The SeaBees and their CEC engineering staff insisted the specs were way over-engineered and did enough to get cargo moving ashore. The storms of June 19 destroyed the Omaha Beach Mulberry, leaving the British one at Arromanches to take the load. The American Mulberry was destroyed and hundreds of ships and thousands of supplies sunk by fierce storms in a few weeks after D-Day. The British Mulberry was heavily damaged.

1944, the Allied forces land troops on Normandy beaches for the largest amphibious landing in history — Operation Overlord (D-Day) — beginning the march eastward to defeat Germany and ultimately destroy the Nazi regime on May 7, 1945.

Assault Wave Cox'n Dwight C. Shepler #141a Watercolor, 1944 88-199-EN The landing craft coxswain was the symbol and fiber of the amphibious force. Exposed to enemy fire as he steered his craft to shore, the lives of thirty-six infantrymen in his small LCVP were his responsibility. If he failed in his mission of landing these troops, the strategy of admirals went for naught; the bombardment of a naval force alone could never gain a foothold on the hostile and contested shore. Prairie boy or city lad, the coxswain became a paragon of courageous determination and seamanship.

Assault Wave Cox’n
Dwight C. Shepler #141a
Watercolor, 1944
88-199-EN
The landing craft coxswain was the symbol and fiber of the amphibious force. Exposed to enemy fire as he steered his craft to shore, the lives of thirty-six infantrymen in his small LCVP were his responsibility. If he failed in his mission of landing these troops, the strategy of admirals went for naught; the bombardment of a naval force alone could never gain a foothold on the hostile and contested shore. Prairie boy or city lad, the coxswain became a paragon of courageous determination and seamanship.

Normandy Invasion, June 1944. Troops in an LCVP landing craft approaching "Omaha" Beach on "D-Day", 6 June 1944. Note helmet netting; faint "No Smoking" sign on the LCVP's ramp; and M1903 rifles and M1 carbines carried by some of these men. This photograph was taken from the same LCVP as Photo # SC 189986. Photograph from the Army Signal Corps Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Normandy Invasion, June 1944. Troops in an LCVP landing craft approaching “Omaha” Beach on “D-Day”, 6 June 1944. Note helmet netting; faint “No Smoking” sign on the LCVP’s ramp; and M1903 rifles and M1 carbines carried by some of these men. This photograph was taken from the same LCVP as Photo # SC 189986. Photograph from the Army Signal Corps Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

The Tough Beach Dwight C. Shepler #147 Watercolor, June 1944 88-199-EU This is what the Allied forces in Normandy called the Omaha beachhead. All day the landing waves suffered terrible attrition from the stubborn, enfilade German fire which raked the shore. A coast studded with beach and underwater obstacles, mines, and German fortified positions and pillboxes, it proved deadly to many American soldiers and sailors on June 6, 1944.

The Tough Beach
Dwight C. Shepler #147
Watercolor, June 1944
88-199-EU
This is what the Allied forces in Normandy called the Omaha beachhead. All day the landing waves suffered terrible attrition from the stubborn, enfilade German fire which raked the shore. A coast studded with beach and underwater obstacles, mines, and German fortified positions and pillboxes, it proved deadly to many American soldiers and sailors on June 6, 1944.

Normandy Invasion, June 1944. Landing ships putting cargo ashore on one of the invasion beaches, at low tide during the first days of the operation, June 1944. Among identifiable ships present are USS LST-532 (in the center of the view); USS LST-262 (3rd LST from right); USS LST-310 (2nd LST from right); USS LST-533 (partially visible at far right); and USS LST-524. Note barrage balloons overhead and Army "half-track" convoy forming up on the beach. Photograph from the U.S. Coast Guard Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Normandy Invasion, June 1944. Landing ships putting cargo ashore on one of the invasion beaches, at low tide during the first days of the operation, June 1944. Among identifiable ships present are USS LST-532 (in the center of the view); USS LST-262 (3rd LST from right); USS LST-310 (2nd LST from right); USS LST-533 (partially visible at far right); and USS LST-524. Note barrage balloons overhead and Army “half-track” convoy forming up on the beach. Photograph from the U.S. Coast Guard Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

90 percent of combat aviators who served at the Battle of Midway earned their wings through Navy Reserve Aviation programs.

After completing training, Naval Aviation‬ Cadets served three years on active duty before being commissioned as Ensigns in the US Navy Reserve. These U.S. Navy Reserve pilots became the nucleus of the U.S. Naval Air Forces that would fight in WWII‬.

Naval Reserve Aviation Cadets receive navigation instruction in front of a Vought OS2U aircraft, circa 1942-43. Note four varieties of uniform worn by the cadets, including khaki working uniforms with flight cap and parachute, aviation working "greens," service dress "white" and service dress "blues." Instructor is wearing a fleece-lined leather flight suite. ( US National Archives 80-G-K-16145)

Naval Reserve Aviation Cadets receive navigation instruction in front of a Vought OS2U aircraft, circa 1942-43. Note four varieties of uniform worn by the cadets, including khaki working uniforms with flight cap and parachute, aviation working “greens,” service dress “white” and service dress “blues.” Instructor is wearing a fleece-lined leather flight suite. ( US National Archives 80-G-K-16145)

Martin BM-1, of VT-1S, take off over the stern of the USS Lexington (CV 2) on May 17, 1934.  USN Photo Collection.

Martin BM-1, of VT-1S, take off over the stern of the USS Lexington (CV 2) on May 17, 1934. USN Photo Collection.

Stearman N2s-3 "Kaydet" training planes on the flight line during World War II.  (US National Archives 80-G-K14044)

Stearman N2s-3 “Kaydet” training planes on the flight line during World War II. (US National Archives 80-G-K14044)

Floyd Bennett Field NY Reserve Squadron Aircraft, 1932.  USN Photo Collection.

Floyd Bennett Field NY Reserve Squadron Aircraft, 1932. USN Photo Collection.

The Battle of Midway begins in 1942. The battle is a decisive win for the U.S, bringing an end to Japanese naval superiority in the Pacific.

Battle of Midway, June 1942. Ensign George H. Gay at Pearl Harbor Naval Hospital, with a nurse and a copy of the "Honolulu Star-Bulletin" newspaper featuring accounts of the battle. He was the only survivor of the 4 June 1942 Torpedo Squadron Eight (VT-8) TBD torpedo plane attack on the Japanese carrier force. Gay's book "Sole Survivor" indicates that the date of this photograph is probably 7 June 1942, following an operation to repair his injured left hand and a meeting with Admiral Chester W. Nimitz. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, U.S. National Archives Collection.

Battle of Midway, June 1942. Ensign George H. Gay at Pearl Harbor Naval Hospital, with a nurse and a copy of the “Honolulu Star-Bulletin” newspaper featuring accounts of the battle. He was the only survivor of the 4 June 1942 Torpedo Squadron Eight (VT-8) TBD torpedo plane attack on the Japanese carrier force.
Gay’s book “Sole Survivor” indicates that the date of this photograph is probably 7 June 1942, following an operation to repair his injured left hand and a meeting with Admiral Chester W. Nimitz. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, U.S. National Archives Collection.

The Battle of Midway Robert Benny #7 Oil on Canvas, circa 1943

The Battle of Midway
Robert Benny #7
Oil on Canvas, circa 1943

Air Attack on Japanese Carriers Griffith Baily Coale #31 Charcoal & pastel, circa 1942

Air Attack on Japanese Carriers
Griffith Baily Coale #31
Charcoal & pastel, circa 1942

Battle of Midway, June 1942. Diorama by Norman Bel Geddes, depicting the explosion of depth charges from USS Hammann (DD-412) as she sank alongside USS Yorktown (CV-5) during the afternoon of 6 June 1942. Both ships were torpedoed by Japanese submarine I-168 while Hammann was assisting with the salvage of Yorktown. USS Vireo (AT-144) is shown at left, coming back to pick up survivors, as destroyers head off to search for the submarine. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Battle of Midway, June 1942. Diorama by Norman Bel Geddes, depicting the explosion of depth charges from USS Hammann (DD-412) as she sank alongside USS Yorktown (CV-5) during the afternoon of 6 June 1942. Both ships were torpedoed by Japanese submarine I-168 while Hammann was assisting with the salvage of Yorktown. USS Vireo (AT-144) is shown at left, coming back to pick up survivors, as destroyers head off to search for the submarine.
Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

1934, USS Ranger (CV 4), the first U.S. Navy ship designed from the keel up as a carrier, is commissioned at Norfolk, Va. During WWII‬, she participates in Operation Torch and Operation Leader.

USS Ranger (CV 4) underway in Hampton Roads, Va., 18 August 1942. Note partially lowered after elevator and flight deck identification letters "R N G R" still visible just ahead of the ramp. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives

USS Ranger (CV 4) underway in Hampton Roads, Va., 18 August 1942. Note partially lowered after elevator and flight deck identification letters “R N G R” still visible just ahead of the ramp. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives

Grumman F3F-1 Fighters of Fighting Squadron Four (VF-4) from USS Ranger (CV 4) In flight over the Southern California coast. Photo is dated January 1939. Plane in the foreground is Bureau # 0261. Original photograph is in the collections of the Aviation History Branch, Naval Historical Center.

Grumman F3F-1 Fighters of Fighting Squadron Four (VF-4) from USS Ranger (CV 4) In flight over the Southern California coast. Photo is dated January 1939. Plane in the foreground is Bureau # 0261. Original photograph is in the collections of the Aviation History Branch, Naval Historical Center.

Sailors stripping ship aboard USS Ranger (CV 4), in anticipation of action off Morocco, circa early November 1942. Paint has been chipped from the bulkheads and overheads as a precaution against fire. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Sailors stripping ship aboard USS Ranger (CV 4), in anticipation of action off Morocco, circa early November 1942. Paint has been chipped from the bulkheads and overheads as a precaution against fire. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

North Africa Operation, November 1942 - testing machine guns of Grumman F4F-4 Wildcat fighters aboard USS Ranger (CV 4), while en route from the U.S. to North African waters, circa early November 1942. Note the special markings used during this operation, with a yellow ring painted around the national insignia on aircraft fuselages. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

North Africa Operation, November 1942 – testing machine guns of Grumman F4F-4 Wildcat fighters aboard USS Ranger (CV 4), while en route from the U.S. to North African waters, circa early November 1942. Note the special markings used during this operation, with a yellow ring painted around the national insignia on aircraft fuselages. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

"Battle of Midway, 3 June 1942" by Claudus Rodolfo, Oil Painting This painting shows a lone Japanese airplane downed in front of a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier. The artist took liberties in many aspects of this painting. He claims that this image shows June 3, 1942; however, the battle did not begin until June 4. Also, the aircraft carrier in the image is USS Yorktown (CV 10), but that particular Yorktown was built in 1943 and is currently on display as a museum ship at Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum, South Carolina. USS Yorktown (CV 5) was the ship lost at the Battle of Midway.

“Battle of Midway, 3 June 1942” by Claudus Rodolfo, Oil Painting
This painting shows a lone Japanese airplane downed in front of a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier.
The artist took liberties in many aspects of this painting. He claims that this image shows June 3, 1942; however, the battle did not begin until June 4. Also, the aircraft carrier in the image is USS Yorktown (CV 10), but that particular Yorktown was built in 1943 and is currently on display as a museum ship at Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum, South Carolina. USS Yorktown (CV 5) was the ship lost at the Battle of Midway.

1917, during ‪‎WWI‬, USS Jupiter (AC 3), transports the first contingent of U.S. ‪‎Naval Aviators‬, the First Naval Aeronautical Detachment, to Pauillac, France. The men are commanded by Lt. Kenneth Whiting. USS Jupiter is later converted into the Navy’s first aircraft carrier USS Langley (CV 1).

Five of the U.S. Navy's early aviators, at Pensacola, Fla. Circa 1915-1916

Five of the U.S. Navy’s early aviators, at Pensacola, Fla. Circa 1915-1916

USS Jupiter (Fuel Ship # 3). Off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 16 October 1913. USN Photo Collection

USS Jupiter (Fuel Ship # 3). Off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 16 October 1913. USN Photo Collection

US Naval Air Station, Pauillac, France. U.S. Navy sailors working on extending the railroad for the A&R Shop, circa WWI. USN Photo Collection.

US Naval Air Station, Pauillac, France. U.S. Navy sailors working on extending the railroad for the A&R Shop, circa WWI. USN Photo Collection.

US Naval Air Station, Pauillac, France, Barracks, Warehouses, and offices, circa WWI. NHHC Photograph Collection, L-File, US Naval Air Stations, Overseas.

US Naval Air Station, Pauillac, France, Barracks, Warehouses, and offices, circa WWI. NHHC Photograph Collection, L-File, US Naval Air Stations, Overseas.

Crash

#MilitaryMonday

Military thank you

US Military appreciation, history and stories in pictures.

1918, USS President Lincoln is torpedoed and sunk by German submarine, (U 90). 26 lives are lost.

Yeoman Howard A. Himmelwright, who was lost in sinking of USS President Lincoln, May 1918. Photo #USN 103369

Yeoman Howard A. Himmelwright, who was lost in sinking of USS President Lincoln, May 1918.
Photo #USN 103369

Officers of USS President Lincoln. Photo #USN 103271

Officers of USS President Lincoln.
Photo #USN 103271

S.S. President Lincoln underway before World War I. She was later named USS President Lincoln. The vessel built by Harland and Wolff (builders of the Titanic , et al.) and acquired in 1917. Photo #USN 41887

S.S. President Lincoln underway before World War I. She was later named USS President Lincoln. The vessel built by Harland and Wolff (builders of the Titanic , et al.) and acquired in 1917.
Photo #USN 41887

Memorial service for those lost with USS President Lincoln, June 1918. Photo #USN 2760

Memorial service for those lost with USS President Lincoln, June 1918.
Photo #USN 2760

U.S. Navy Sailors and Marines from USS Newark (C 1) and USS Oregon (BB 3) arrive at Peking, China, to protect U.S. and foreign diplomatic legations during the Boxer Rebellion in 1900. They are joined by Sailors and Marines from Britain, France, Russia, Italy and Japan.

Boxer Rebellion, 1900. Colt machine gun (also known as a "potato digger") and crew left at Legation. McCalla Collections. Presented to the Navy Library by Captain Dudley W. Knox, USN, (Retired), 1926.

Boxer Rebellion, 1900. Colt machine gun (also known as a “potato digger”) and crew left at Legation. McCalla Collections. Presented to the Navy Library by Captain Dudley W. Knox, USN, (Retired), 1926.

Boxer Rebellion, 1900. Marines defend Peking Legations. Artwork by John Clymer, USMC. Courtesy of the US Marine Corps History Division, #55.

Boxer Rebellion, 1900. Marines defend Peking Legations. Artwork by John Clymer, USMC. Courtesy of the US Marine Corps History Division, #55.

Troops of the Eight nations alliance of 1900. Left to right: Britain, United States, Australian colonial, British India, Germany, France, Austria-Hungary, Italy, Japan. 1900.

Troops of the Eight nations alliance of 1900. Left to right: Britain, United States, Australian colonial, British India, Germany, France, Austria-Hungary, Italy, Japan. 1900.

Boxer Rebellion, 1900. The kind of guards furnished to Legations by the Chinese Government. McCalla Collections. Presented to the Navy Library by Captain Dudley W. Knox, USN, (Retired), 1926.

Boxer Rebellion, 1900. The kind of guards furnished to Legations by the Chinese Government. McCalla Collections. Presented to the Navy Library by Captain Dudley W. Knox, USN, (Retired), 1926.

1904, the Marine Detachment from USS Brooklyn (ACR 3) lands at Tangiers, Morocco to protect the American Consulate during the dispute between Raisuli and the Sultan Abdelaziz of Morocco.

USS Brooklyn crew and goat Photo #USN 93704

USS Brooklyn crew and goat
Photo #USN 93704

USS Brooklyn (Armored Cruiser No. 3) In New York Harbor during the Spanish-American War victory naval parade, August 1898. Photo #USN 63096

USS Brooklyn (Armored Cruiser No. 3) In New York Harbor during the Spanish-American War victory naval parade, August 1898.
Photo #USN 63096

Berth deck cooks aboard cruiser USS Brooklyn, 1899. Library of Congress

Berth deck cooks aboard cruiser USS Brooklyn, 1899.
Library of Congress

2004, USS Pinckney (DDG 91) is commissioned at Naval Construction Battalion Center, Port Hueneme, Calif. The Arleigh Burke-class destroyer is named for Cook 1st Class William Pinckney, a Navy Cross recipient.

PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 14, 2007) - USS Princeton (CG 59), USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) and USS Pinckney (DDG 91) transit behind the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) during a joint photo exercise marking the conclusion of Valiant Shield 2007 (VS07). The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group (CSG) and embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11 are deployed in the U.S. 7th Fleet. Valiant Shield 2007 was the largest joint exercise in recent history, including 30 ships, more than 280 aircraft, and more than 20,000 service members from the Navy, Marines Corps, Air Force and Coast Guard. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Eduardo Zaragoza

PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 14, 2007) – USS Princeton (CG 59), USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) and USS Pinckney (DDG 91) transit behind the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) during a joint photo exercise marking the conclusion of Valiant Shield 2007 (VS07). The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group (CSG) and embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11 are deployed in the U.S. 7th Fleet. Valiant Shield 2007 was the largest joint exercise in recent history, including 30 ships, more than 280 aircraft, and more than 20,000 service members from the Navy, Marines Corps, Air Force and Coast Guard. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Eduardo Zaragoza

The guided-missile destroyer USS Pinckney (DDG 91) fires its MK-45 5-inch/54-caliber gun during a pre-aim calibration fire (PACFIRE) training exercise. The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is on a routine deployment to the region.
(U.S. Navy Photo)

GULF OF THAILAND: A U.S. Navy MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter lands aboard USS Pinckney (DDG 91) during a crew swap before returning on task in the search and rescue for the missing Malaysian airlines flight MH370. (U.S. Navy Photo)

GULF OF THAILAND: A U.S. Navy MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter lands aboard USS Pinckney (DDG 91) during a crew swap before returning on task in the search and rescue for the missing Malaysian airlines flight MH370.
(U.S. Navy Photo)

INCHEON, Republic of Korea - The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Pinckney (DDG 91) pulls into a lock gate to accommodate for different water levels as the ship makes way to port in Incheon, Republic of Korea. Pinckney is in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eddie Harrison)

INCHEON, Republic of Korea – The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Pinckney (DDG 91) pulls into a lock gate to accommodate for different water levels as the ship makes way to port in Incheon, Republic of Korea. Pinckney is in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eddie Harrison)

The only U.S. carrier lost in the Atlantic during WWII‬, USS Block Island (CVE 21) was torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U-549 in 1944. U-549 was later sunk that night by USS Eugene E. Elmore (DE 686) and USS Ahrens (DE 575).

USS Block Island (CVE 21) after torpedo hits from U-549, 29 May 1944. Image from Task Group 21.11 Serial 0027 Report, copied June 1978.

USS Block Island (CVE 21) after torpedo hits from U-549, 29 May 1944. Image from Task Group 21.11 Serial 0027 Report, copied June 1978.

USS Block Island (CVE 21) underway in the Atlantic, off the mouth of Chesapeake Bay (36-54'N, 75-22'W, course 090) on 15 October 1943. Parked on her flight deck are twelve TBF/TBM Avenger torpedo planes and nine F4F/FM Wildcat fighters. Photographed from a blimp of squadron ZP-14.

USS Block Island (CVE 21) underway in the Atlantic, off the mouth of Chesapeake Bay (36-54’N, 75-22’W, course 090) on 15 October 1943. Parked on her flight deck are twelve TBF/TBM Avenger torpedo planes and nine F4F/FM Wildcat fighters. Photographed from a blimp of squadron ZP-14.

USS Block Island (CVE 21), on trials, circa March 1943. National Archives photograph.

USS Block Island (CVE 21), on trials, circa March 1943. National Archives photograph.

USS Block Island (CVE 21), on trails, March 1943. National Archives photograph.

USS Block Island (CVE 21), on trails, March 1943. National Archives photograph.

A SH-60F Seahawk assigned to Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Five (HS-5) aboard USS John F Kennedy (CV 67) lowers a package on a rescue hoist to ‪#US Navy submarine USS Boise (SSN 764) on May 28, 2002. The Kennedy Battle Group was conducting combat operations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Photographers Mate 1st Class Jim Hampshire:

13

Raising History: Bringing CSS Georgia to the Surface. The Savannah District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is hosting a special lecture this evening at 7 p.m., at the Savannah History Museum.

Here’s a look at what ‪‎US Navy divers, Navy History’s Underwater Archaeology Branch, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Headquarters and other partners are doing to preserve this piece of‪ American and ‪‎Naval History‬.

Archaeologists working for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District, and divers and salvage operations teams from the U.S. Navy, retrieve a 64-square foot section of a Civil War ironclad warship from the bottom of the Savannah River the evening of Nov. 12, 2013.

The South will rise again – just one piece at a time – as U.S. Navy divers from Mobile Diving Salvage Unit (MDSU-2) work to free parts of the Confederate ironclad Georgia from the murky, muddy waters of the Savannah River channel.

The Navy divers will work with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) June 1-July 20 as part of the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project, which will deepen the channel from 42 to 47 feet. Part of that project requires the recovery of the ironclad which lies in the path of future dredging.

MDSU-2 will bring up the ship’s armor systems, steam engine components and all her weapons, including four cannons and as many as 50 projectiles, such as rifle shells or cannon balls.

It is a mission that will highlight the skills of Navy divers – quite befitting since 2015 is the Year of the Military Diver.

Navy Diver 1st Class Pete Kozminsky (right) assists Navy Diver 1st Class Calum Sanders, assigned to Mobile Diving Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2, don a Kirby Morgan 37 dive helmet during diver training at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story, Virginia Beach, Va., May 14 to prepare for an upcoming assignment to salvage CSS Georgia in the Savannah River, Ga., June 1-July 20.

Navy Diver 1st Class Pete Kozminsky (right) assists Navy Diver 1st Class Calum Sanders, assigned to Mobile Diving Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2, don a Kirby Morgan 37 dive helmet during diver training at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story, Virginia Beach, Va., May 14 to prepare for an upcoming assignment to salvage CSS Georgia in the Savannah River, Ga., June 1-July 20.

“This is what we live for; it’s what we do day in and day out. When it comes to mobile diving, salvage, underwater ship husbandry and force protection, these guys are more proficient than any dive team in the Navy right now,” said Chief Warrant Officer Jason Potts, who leads Mobile Diving Salvage Company 23.

They won’t, however, be the only military personnel involved. Once the weapons are brought onshore, Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians from EOD Mobile Unit 6 Shore Detachment King’s Bay, Ga., will assist in the recovery, and Marine Corps EOD techs will get the ordnance to an offsite location.

Overseeing the operation will be civilian archaeologists from the Underwater Archaeology Branch of the Naval History and Heritage Command, which has been tracking CSS Georgia’s progress since its first excavation dive in the fall of 2013.

“The CSS Georgia recovery project is one of the more interesting projects NHHC underwater archaeologists are undertaking,” said UA branch head Robert Neyland, Ph.D. “The Georgia will be the only Confederate ironclad to be recovered and preserved.”

Neyland was among those who attended the “test” excavation in Nov. 2013 and was the project director and chief archaeologist on the recovery team for Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley.

During the 2013 excavation, it was “revealed the wooden hull has been lost over time due to current, erosion and previous salvage activities,” Neyland said, leaving behind “a substantial amount of armor made from railroad iron, cannon, ordnance.”

Other artifacts recovered have revealed a glimpse into the design and operation of the ship as well as life onboard, he added.

Apparently it wasn’t very pleasant.

The Rebel Iron-clad ‘Georgia’ Line engraving published in Harper’s Weekly, 1863, depicting the CSS Georgia, an ironclad floating battery that served in the defenses of Savannah, Georgia. U.S. Naval History & HC Photograph.

The Rebel Iron-clad ‘Georgia’ Line engraving published in Harper’s Weekly, 1863, depicting the CSS Georgia, an ironclad floating battery that served in the defenses of Savannah, Georgia. U.S. Naval History & HC Photograph.

It “was an extremely hostile environment for the crew who had to work in engine rooms under hellish heat and humidity,” Neyland explained. “The discovery of numerous sets of leg irons highlights these harsh conditions that led sailors to desert. The ship never saw action, which also leads one to believe boredom added to the crew’s discomfort.”

Some of those artifacts will be featured during a free lecture the week before the divers begin their work. The lecture was held at 7 p.m. May 28 at the auditorium of the Savannah History Museum, 303 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Savannah, Ga. The guest speakers were two of the lead archaeologists involved in preserving the ship’s artifacts: Steven James, M.A., with Panamerican Consultants, a principal investigator on the project, and Gordon Watts, PhD., of Tidewater Atlantic Research, co-principal investigator.

Topics for the lecture included the ship’s construction, since there are no blueprints on how the ship was built. The lecture also discussed life aboard the ironclad, as well as how the recovered artifacts will be preserved.

The lecture, which was sponsored by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District, was hosted by the Coastal Heritage Society. It was the first of eight public outreach efforts focused on CSS Georgia’s recovery, which is expected to cost the Corps of Engineers up to $14 million. The Corps of Engineers works with the Conservation Research Laboratory at Texas A&M University.

CSS Georgia was built and commissioned in 1863 to protect the river channels below Savannah and Fort Jackson during the Civil War. The ironclad, however, lacked effective locomotion, so she was used mostly as a floating battery. On Dec. 21, 1864, Georgia was scuttled to prevent the ship from falling into the hands of the rapidly advancing Union army led by Gen. William T. Sherman.

After 104 years nestled in the muddy bottom of the Savannah River, the wreck was discovered in 1968 during dredging operations of the channel. Some items were removed during the 1980s. Located on U.S. Navy property, the site was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1987, according to the U.S. Navy’s Supervisor of Salvage and Division (SUPSALV), part of Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA).

When the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project threatened CSS Georgia’s remains, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers stepped in to oversee its excavation under the National Historic Preservation Act. The multi-phase operation began in November 2013 with an initial excavation of a 65-square-foot portion of the upper deck structure with iron to determine the condition of the hull material. From there, a plan to recover and relocate historic artifacts was mapped out, with MDSU-2 providing underwater survey, rigging and topside support.

NHHC’s Underwater Archaeology Branch will validate the redeposit and reburial of sections of the ship below water in a back channel area so it can be preserved and protected should funding later come available to preserve and display CSS Georgia.

“NHHC is the federal owner of the wreck and its artifacts and is working with the USACE-Savannah District and State of Georgia to preserve the ship remains and artifacts and make these available for exhibit and interpretation,” Neyland said. “The NHHC mission fosters United States naval heritage and the lessons learned from that history to the current Navy and the American public.”

On the Web: To follow the CSS Georgia project, visit http://1.usa.gov/1G6S2Hn

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#MilitaryMonday #MilitaryAppreciationMonth

Military thank you

A weekly feature honoring the military and the sacrifices they make for freedom, covered in historical images.

1930, the streamlined submarine (V 5) was commissioned. In February 1931, she was named Narwhal, and received the hull number (SS 167) that July. During WWII, Narwhal received 15 battle stars for her war patrols in the Pacific.

Navy Poster, showing USS Narwhal (SS 167). Artwork by Matt Murphy, 8 January 1941. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 77240.

Navy Poster, showing USS Narwhal (SS 167). Artwork by Matt Murphy, 8 January 1941. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 77240.

USS Narwhal (SS 167), artwork by Gordon Grant, 1943. Lithograph by Northern Pump Company, 1943. Courtesy of Captain R.M. Barnes, USN, (Retired). NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 95377-KN (Color)

USS Narwhal (SS 167), artwork by Gordon Grant, 1943. Lithograph by Northern Pump Company, 1943. Courtesy of Captain R.M. Barnes, USN, (Retired). NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 95377-KN (Color)

3

Above: Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Hawaii. Aerial view of the Submarine Base, with part of the supply depot beyond and the fuel farm at right, looking north on 13 October 1941. Note the fuel tank across the road from the submarine base, painted to resemble a building. The building beside the submarine ascent tower (in left center, shaped like an upside down “U”) housed the U.S. Fleet Headquarters at the time of the Japanese attack on 7 December 1941.

Office of Admiral Husband E. Kimmel, the Fleet’s Commander in Chief, was in the upper left corner of the building’s top floor. USS Wharton (AP-7) is in right foreground. Among the submarines at the base are Tuna (SS-203), Gudgeon (SS-211), Argonaut (SS-166), Narwhal (SS-167), Triton (SS-201) and Dolphin (SS-169). USS Holland (AS-3) and USS Niagara (PG-52) are alongside the wharf on the base’s north side. In the distance (nearest group in upper left) are the battleship Nevada (BB-36), at far left, USS Castor (AKS-1) and the derelict old minelayer Baltimore. Cruisers in top center are USS Minneapolis (CA-36), closest to camera, and USS Pensacola (CA-24), wearing a Measure 5 painted “bow wave”. National Archives photograph: 80-G-451125.

USS Narwhal (SS 167) off the Mare Island Navy Yard, 3 April 1943.  Both the Narwhal and her sister Nautiliss were used heavily for the Marine Raiders. Their two 6 inch deck guns could give quite effective fire support. National Archives photograph, 190-N-42917.

USS Narwhal (SS 167) off the Mare Island Navy Yard, 3 April 1943. Both the Narwhal and her sister Nautiliss were used heavily for the Marine Raiders. Their two 6 inch deck guns could give quite effective fire support. National Archives photograph, 190-N-42917.

1900, USS Kentucky (BB 6) is commissioned. In 1907, she joined the Great White Fleet, returning in 1909.

USS Kentucky (BB 6) photographed in July 1900, a few months after she was commissioned. Courtesy of the Filson Club, Louisville, KY. Gift of Mrs. Alexander M. Watson. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

USS Kentucky (BB 6) photographed in July 1900, a few months after she was commissioned. Courtesy of the Filson Club, Louisville, KY. Gift of Mrs. Alexander M. Watson. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

USS Kentucky ship's officers, crew and Marines, circa 1914. Most of the Marines are wearing khaki field uniforms. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

USS Kentucky ship’s officers, crew and Marines, circa 1914. Most of the Marines are wearing khaki field uniforms. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

USS Kentucky (BB 6) photograph taken circa 1912-1916, after modernization with basket masts. It has been color-tinted and published on a post card. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

USS Kentucky (BB 6) photograph taken circa 1912-1916, after modernization with basket masts. It has been color-tinted and published on a post card. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

1919, the Marine detachment from USS Arizona (BB 39) guards the U.S. consulate at Constantinople, Turkey, during the Greek occupation of the city.

In June 1915, the crowd witnesses Miss Esther Ross, sponsor of the battleship Arizona, arrive. Courtesy of The Library of Congress.

In June 1915, the crowd witnesses Miss Esther Ross, sponsor of the battleship Arizona, arrive.
Courtesy of The Library of Congress.

USS Arizona's ship's complement posing on her forecastle, forward turrets and superstructure, circa 1924. The officer seated in the second row, 4th from right, is Ensign Arleigh A. Burke. USNHC # NH 86101, courtesy of Naval Historical Center, from the Collection of Admiral Arleigh A. Burke.

USS Arizona’s ship’s complement posing on her forecastle, forward turrets and superstructure, circa 1924. The officer seated in the second row, 4th from right, is Ensign Arleigh A. Burke. USNHC # NH 86101, courtesy of Naval Historical Center, from the Collection of Admiral Arleigh A. Burke.

A French built Nieuport aircraft is pictured on a wooden deck constructed atop a turret. Note the Arizona's (BB 39) bell behind the plane.  Courtesy of The Library of Congress.

A French built Nieuport aircraft is pictured on a wooden deck constructed atop a turret.
Note the Arizona’s (BB 39) bell behind the plane.
Courtesy of The Library of Congress.

Arizona (BB 39) anchored, possibly on the Hudson after returning from Europe. Courtesy of The Library of Congress.

Arizona (BB 39) anchored, possibly on the Hudson after returning from Europe.
Courtesy of The Library of Congress.

1801, Tripoli declares war on the United States for not increasing the annual tribute paid as protection money to prevent raids on its ships. Within less than a week, a squadron, under Commodore Richard Dale, sets sail to protect American interests and arrives July 1 at Gibraltar.

USS President, 1800-1815, artwork by Boucher done in 1819 and captioned, “United States Frigate ‘President’, flagship of the American Squadron, Captain Stephen Decatur, 1819.” NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 592.

USS President, 1800-1815, artwork by Boucher done in 1819 and captioned, “United States Frigate ‘President’, flagship of the American Squadron, Captain Stephen Decatur, 1819.” NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 592.

“The Assault on Derna, Tripoli, 27 April 1805.” Artwork by Charles Waterhouse. Courtesy of the US Marine Corps History Division. After a bombardment of Tripoli, a landing party with Lieutenant O'Bannon of the Marines in command hauled down the Tripolitan flag and hoisted Old Glory for the first time over a fort in the old world. April 27, 1805. Copy of artwork by Capolino., 1927 – 1981

“The Assault on Derna, Tripoli, 27 April 1805.” Artwork by Charles Waterhouse. Courtesy of the US Marine Corps History Division.
After a bombardment of Tripoli, a landing party with Lieutenant O’Bannon of the Marines in command hauled down the Tripolitan flag and hoisted Old Glory for the first time over a fort in the old world. April 27, 1805. Copy of artwork by Capolino., 1927 – 1981

"Decatur Boarding the Tripolitan Gunboat", during the bombardment of Tripoli, 3 August 1804. Oil by Dennis Malone Carter, 43" x 59", depicting Lieutenant Stephen Decatur (lower right center) in mortal combat with the Tripolitan Captain. Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation, Washington, DC. NHHC Photograph Collection: NH 44647-KN (Color).

“Decatur Boarding the Tripolitan Gunboat”, during the bombardment of Tripoli, 3 August 1804. Oil by Dennis Malone Carter, 43″ x 59″, depicting Lieutenant Stephen Decatur (lower right center) in mortal combat with the Tripolitan Captain. Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation, Washington, DC. NHHC Photograph Collection: NH 44647-KN (Color).

1964, the first all-nuclear-powered task group, USS Enterprise (CVAN 65), USS Long Beach (CGN 9) and USS Bainbridge (DLGN 25), is organized and deploys to the Sixth Fleet. The task group departs in July and circumnavigates the globe without refueling.

Task Force One (All-Nuclear Task Force) operating in the Mediterranean Sea, 18 June 1964. Enterprise crewmembers are spelling out Albert Einstein’s equation for nuclear energy on the flight deck. National Archives Photograph, KN 9027 (Color).

Task Force One (All-Nuclear Task Force) operating in the Mediterranean Sea, 18 June 1964. Enterprise crewmembers are spelling out Albert Einstein’s equation for nuclear energy on the flight deck. National Archives Photograph, KN 9027 (Color).

Task Force One: USS Bainbridge (DLGN 25); USS Long Beach (CGN 9); and USS Enterprise (CVAN 65) in Operation Sea Orbit, which was the first circumnavigation of the glob by a nuclear-powered naval power, 31 August – 3 October 1964. Artwork by Captain Gerard Richardson, USNR. National Archives photograph: KN 9983 (Color).

Task Force One: USS Bainbridge (DLGN 25); USS Long Beach (CGN 9); and USS Enterprise (CVAN 65) in Operation Sea Orbit, which was the first circumnavigation of the glob by a nuclear-powered naval power, 31 August – 3 October 1964. Artwork by Captain Gerard Richardson, USNR. National Archives photograph: KN 9983 (Color).

USS Bainbridge (DLGN 25). Underway during her sea trials, 2-3 September 1962. Photographed by Areostatico. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 98103.

USS Bainbridge (DLGN 25). Underway during her sea trials, 2-3 September 1962. Photographed by Areostatico. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 98103.

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Above: USS Enterprise (CVAN 65) underway in formation with USS Long Beach (CGN 9), center, and USS Bainbridge (DLGN 25), at top, probably in the Mediterranean Sea in June-July 1964. Members of Enterprise’s crew are in a flight deck formation spelling out Albert Einstein’s equation for nuclear energy. Planes on her flight deck include 9 A-5, 22 A-4; 10 F-4; 14 F-8 and 2 E-1 types. Those aft are parked in an arrowhead arrangement. The photograph was released for publication on 30 July 1964, upon the commencement of Operation Sea Orbit, the circumnavigation of the World by Task Force One, made up of the Navy’s first three nuclear-powered surface ships. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

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Military thank you

May 1934, the USS Constitution completes a 3-year, 90 port city tour along the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific coasts. After her journey, she returned to Boston, Mass. where she remains today as part of the Boston National Historical Parks.

USS Constitution, (1797-____) arriving at San Francisco, California, during her tour of ninety United States Ports, 1933. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 70818.

USS Constitution, (1797-____) arriving at San Francisco, California, during her tour of ninety United States Ports, 1933. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 70818.

USS Constitution, (1797-____) in Gaillard Cut, Panama Canal. Photographed during her 1931-34 cruise. Courtesy of Commander Louis J. Gulliver, USN, (Retired), July 1940. He was in command of USS Constitution during her 1931-34 cruise. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 55938

USS Constitution, (1797-____) in Gaillard Cut, Panama Canal. Photographed during her 1931-34 cruise. Courtesy of Commander Louis J. Gulliver, USN, (Retired), July 1940. He was in command of USS Constitution during her 1931-34 cruise. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 55938

USS Constitution, (1797-____) being greeted by Curtiss OC Observation Aircraft. Photographed during her 1931-34 cruise. Courtesy of Commander Louis J. Gulliver, USN, (Retired), July 1940. He was in command of Constitution during her 1933-34 cruise. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 55934.

USS Constitution, (1797-____) being greeted by Curtiss OC Observation Aircraft. Photographed during her 1931-34 cruise. Courtesy of Commander Louis J. Gulliver, USN, (Retired), July 1940. He was in command of Constitution during her 1933-34 cruise. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 55934.

USS Constitution, (1797-____), in the Chagres River approaching the first lock at the Panama Canal. USS Grebe (AM 43) is astern. Photographed during her 1931-34. Courtesy of Commander Louis J. Gulliver, USN, (Retired), July 1940. He was in command of USS Constitution during her 1931-34 cruise. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 55937.

USS Constitution, (1797-____), in the Chagres River approaching the first lock at the Panama Canal. USS Grebe (AM 43) is astern. Photographed during her 1931-34. Courtesy of Commander Louis J. Gulliver, USN, (Retired), July 1940. He was in command of USS Constitution during her 1931-34 cruise. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 55937.

In 1944, USS Ticonderoga (CV 14) was commissioned during WWII‬ and served in several campaigns in the Pacific earning five battle stars.

USS Ticonderoga (CVS 14), circa the late 1960's or early 1970's. Photo # NH 97488-KN

USS Ticonderoga (CVS 14), circa the late 1960’s or early 1970’s.
Photo # NH 97488-KN

Four U.S. Navy Grumman S-2E Trackers from Anti-Submarine Squadron VS-21 Lightning Bolts and VS-29 Tromboners fly over the aircraft carrier USS Ticonderoga (CVS 14) as she arrives at San Diego, Calif., following her conversion to an anti-submarine warfare carrier. VS-21 and VS-29 were assigned to Carrier Anti-Submarine Air Group 53 (CVSG-53) aboard the Ticonderoga in 1970. Date: June 26, 1970  Source U.S. Navy National Museum of Naval Aviation photo No. 1996.488.039.063

Four U.S. Navy Grumman S-2E Trackers from Anti-Submarine Squadron VS-21 Lightning Bolts and VS-29 Tromboners fly over the aircraft carrier USS Ticonderoga (CVS 14) as she arrives at San Diego, Calif., following her conversion to an anti-submarine warfare carrier. VS-21 and VS-29 were assigned to Carrier Anti-Submarine Air Group 53 (CVSG-53) aboard the Ticonderoga in 1970.
Date: June 26, 1970
Source U.S. Navy National Museum of Naval Aviation photo No. 1996.488.039.063

Grumman F6F Hellcat fighters from USS Ticonderoga (CV 14) prepare to take off for strikes against targets in Manila Bay. The two leading planes are F6F-5N night fighters, with wing-mounted radar. Photograph is dated Jan. 9, 1945, but may have been taken during the 5-6 November 1944 attacks. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.  Catalog #: 80-G-305244

Grumman F6F Hellcat fighters from USS Ticonderoga (CV 14) prepare to take off for strikes against targets in Manila Bay. The two leading planes are F6F-5N night fighters, with wing-mounted radar. Photograph is dated Jan. 9, 1945, but may have been taken during the 5-6 November 1944 attacks. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.
Catalog #: 80-G-305244

USS Ticonderoga (CV 14) afire after she was hit by a Kamikaze attack off Formosa, Jan. 21, 1945. Photographed from USS Miami (CL 89). A Vought OS2U Kingfisher floatplane is on the cruiser's starboard catapult, in the foreground. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.  Catalog #: 80-G-273151

USS Ticonderoga (CV 14) afire after she was hit by a Kamikaze attack off Formosa, Jan. 21, 1945. Photographed from USS Miami (CL 89). A Vought OS2U Kingfisher floatplane is on the cruiser’s starboard catapult, in the foreground. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.
Catalog #: 80-G-273151

May 8, 2015: More than 50 vintage ‪#WWII‬ aircraft flying over our nations Capital as we commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Allied Victory in Europe. ‪#‎VEDay70‬

Vintage military aircraft Vought F4U ‘Corsair’ flies over the Washington Navy Yard, on the 70th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day, May 8, as part of the Arsenal of Democracy to honor World War II veterans.

Vintage military aircraft Vought F4U ‘Corsair’ flies over the Washington Navy Yard, on the 70th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day, May 8, as part of the Arsenal of Democracy to honor World War II veterans.

(May 8, 2015) – A formation of North American B-25 ‘Mitchell’ aircraft fly’s over Arlington, VA. while participating in the  70th anniversary of the Allied Victory in Europe ‘Arsenal of Democracy’ Flyover of Washington D.C. Fifty-six aircraft from various organizations shared in the event and the B-25 ‘Mitchell’ was the aircraft used in “Doolittle’s Raid Over Tokyo” on April, 18, 1942.

(May 8, 2015) – A formation of North American B-25 ‘Mitchell’ aircraft fly’s over Arlington, VA. while participating in the
70th anniversary of the Allied Victory in Europe ‘Arsenal of Democracy’ Flyover of Washington D.C. Fifty-six aircraft from various organizations shared in the event and the B-25 ‘Mitchell’ was the aircraft used in “Doolittle’s Raid Over Tokyo” on April, 18, 1942.

Vintage military aircraft flies over the Mall in Washington, on the 70th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day, May 8, as part of the Arsenal of Democracy to honor World War II veterans.

Vintage military aircraft flies over the Mall in Washington, on the 70th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day, May 8, as part of the Arsenal of Democracy to honor World War II veterans.

Vintage military aircraft fly over the Washington Navy Yard and display ship Barry (DD 933), on the 70th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day, May 8, as part of the Arsenal of Democracy to honor World War II veterans.

Vintage military aircraft fly over the Washington Navy Yard and display ship Barry (DD 933), on the 70th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day, May 8, as part of the Arsenal of Democracy to honor World War II veterans.

A Consolidated PBY ‘Catalina’ aircraft fly’s over the Washington Navy Yard as part of the 70th anniversary of the Allied Victory in Europe.

A Consolidated PBY ‘Catalina’ aircraft fly’s over the Washington Navy Yard as part of the 70th anniversary of the Allied Victory in Europe.

(May 8, 2015) – Two Vought F4U ‘Corsiar’ aircraft fly in formation over Arlington, VA. while participating in the 70th anniversary of the Allied Victory in Europe ‘Arsenal of Democracy’ Flyover of Washington D.C. Fifty-six aircraft from various organizations shared in the event.

(May 8, 2015) – Two Vought F4U ‘Corsiar’ aircraft fly in formation over Arlington, VA. while participating in the 70th anniversary of the Allied Victory in Europe ‘Arsenal of Democracy’ Flyover of Washington D.C. Fifty-six aircraft from various organizations shared in the event.

(May 8, 2015) – A Grumman TBM ‘Avenger’, Vought F4U ‘Corsair’, North American P-51 ‘Mustang’, and Curtiss P-40 ‘Warhawk’ fly in formation while participating in the 70th anniversary of the Allied Victory in Europe ‘Arsenal of Democracy’ Flyover of Washington D.C. Fifty-six aircraft from various organizations shared in the event.

(May 8, 2015) – A Grumman TBM ‘Avenger’, Vought F4U ‘Corsair’, North American P-51 ‘Mustang’, and Curtiss P-40 ‘Warhawk’ fly in formation while participating in the 70th anniversary of the Allied Victory in Europe ‘Arsenal of Democracy’ Flyover of Washington D.C. Fifty-six aircraft from various organizations shared in the event.

And finally, Douglas TBD-1 torpedo planes from USS Enterprise (CV 6) In flight, circa 1939. Plane closest to the camera is # 0318. Note how stripes painted on wings assist pilots in maintaining three-plane V formation. Collection of Vice Adm. George C. Dyer, USN (Retired). U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

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