05 Feb 1971: Apollo 14 Lunar Landing Mission at Fra Mauro

Apollo 14

The prime crew of the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission. From left to right they are: Command Module pilot, Stuart A. Roosa, Commander, Alan B. Shepard Jr. and Lunar Module pilot Edgar D. Mitchell. The Apollo 14 mission emblem is in the background.

On February 5, 1971, Capt. Alan B. Shepard, Jr., Apollo 14 Commander, and Cdr. Edgar D. Mitchell, Lunar Module Pilot became the 5th and 6th human to walk on the Moon. During the 9 day mission, 94 lbs of lunar material was collected and Shepard became the first person to hit a golf ball on the moon. Col. Stuart A. Roosa was the command module pilot on this mission. Recovery was by helicopter from USS New Orleans (LPH-11).

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“GOSS Mission Profile”
Apollo manned lunar landing graphic, published by NASA 1967. Photo: NASA / JSC.

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Apollo 14 Saturn V launch vehicle on transporter, on a incline the transporter compensates to maintain a level platform.
Photo: NASA

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The huge, 363-feet tall Apollo 14 (Spacecraft 110/Lunar Module 8/Saturn 509) space vehicle is launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 4:03:02 p.m. (EST), Jan. 31, 1971, on a lunar landing mission. This view of the liftoff was taken by a camera mounted on the mobile launch tower. Aboard the Apollo 14 spacecraft were astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander; Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot; and Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot. Courtesy of the NASA Photograph Collection: S71-17620.

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Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., Apollo 14 Commander, stands by the U.S. flag on the lunar Fra Mauro Highlands during the early moments of the first extravehicular activity (EVA-1) of the mission. Shadows of the Lunar Module “Antares”, astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, Lunar Module pilot, and the erectable S-band Antenna surround the scene of the third American flag planting to be performed on the lunar surface.

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A front view of the Apollo 14 Lunar Module “Antares”, which reflects a circular flare caused by the brilliant sun. The unusual ball of light was said by the astronauts to have a jewel-like appearance. At extreme left, the lower slope of Cone Crater can be seen. Courtesy of the NASA Photograph Collection.

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The third United States flag to be deployed on the lunar surface, footprints, wheel tracks and the “Rickshaw”-type portable workbench, as seen by the two moon-exploring astronauts from inside the Lunar Module (LM), give evidence of a busy first extravehicular activity (EVA) period. The two-wheeled cart is the Apollo modularized equipment transporter (MET), covered with a sheet of foil material to protect the cameras and rock box between EVAs. While astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander, and Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot, descended in the LM, astronaut Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit, 5 February 1971. Courtesy of the NASA Photograph Collection: AS14-66-9325

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An excellent view of the Apollo 14 Lunar Module (LM) on the moon, as photographed during the first Apollo 14 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the lunar surface. While astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander, and Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot, descended in the LM to explore the moon, astronaut Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit. Courtesy of the NASA Photograph Collection: AS14-66-9278.

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The Apollo Command and Service Modules (CSM) are photographed against a black sky background from the Lunar Module (LM) above the moon. While astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander, and Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot, descended in the LM “Antares” to explore the Fra Mauro region of the moon, astronaut Stuart A. Roosa , command module pilot, remained with the CSM “Kitty Hawk” in lunar orbit, 5 February 1971. Courtesy of the NASA Photograph Collection: AS14-66-9344.

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USS New Orleans (LPH 11), underway, 3 March 1969. Photographed by PH1 M. Blair. NHHC Photograph Collection, L-File, Ships.

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Large format Panorama,
Apollo 14 Landing Site, Solar Wind Collector
Feature(s): Cone Ridge.
Photo: NASA

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NASA Lunar Chart,
U.S. Defense Mapping Agency LPC-1
1:10,000,000
2nd Edition 1979.
Image: NASA

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Uncalibrated LROC NAC image of the Apollo 14 landing site and nearby Cone crater. The trail followed by the astronauts can clearly be discerned. Image width is 1.6 km. Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University.

More about the above image at http://1.usa.gov/1kd3riA

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Plaque left on the Lunar Lander, Apollo 14, NASA Photo.

On the Web:

Apollo 14 primary flight crew bios on the NASA / JSC website:
www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/shepard-alan.html
www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/mitchell-ed.html
www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/roosa-sa.html

Read more about Apollo 14 on the Smithsonian website: http://bit.ly/1buS68D

More about the Apollo Program on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration – NASA website: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/index.html

Apollo 14 Press kit: www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a14/A14_PressKit.pdf

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Retro Photos: US Navy, January 21 – 1945, 1954, 1961

retro photos header

 

Jan. 21, 1945: Task Force 38 Aircraft attacked Japanese shipping

On January 21, 1945, TF 38 aircraft attacked Japanese shipping and airfields on Formosa and in the Pescadores. Japanese planes make counterattacks on TF 38 ships. The following ships were damaged: USS Ticonderoga (CV 14), USS Maddox (DD 731) and USS Langley (CVL 27). During this mission, TF 38 planes sank around 15 enemy vessels.

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USS Langely (CVL-27), docked, unknown date and location. Courtesy of Mr. Donald M. McPherson, 1969. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 67579.

Japanese vessels sunk were: fleet tankers Eiho Maru and Manjo Maru; cargo ship Kuroshio Maru; army cargo ships Enoura Maru, Asaka Maru, No.2 Nichiyo Maru, and Teifu Maru,; army tankers Shincho Maru, No.3 Hoei Maru, army tankers Shincho Maru, No.3 Hoei Maru, No. 5 Hoei Maru, and Yamazawa Maru,; fishing boat Brunei Maru; and cargo vessels Daijo Maru and Yayoi Maru. Planes from USS Yorktown (CV 10) and USS Cabot (CVL 28) also sank the merchant tanker at Munakata Maru at Keelung.

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USS Ticonderoga (CV 14), off Hampton Roads, Virginia, 26 June 1944. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 92237.
Japanese vessels damaged were: destroyers Kashi and Sugi, landing ships T.114 and T.143, freighter Yulin Maru, and water supply vessel Mikko Maru off Takao, Formosa and the Japanese destroyer Harukaze was also damaged off Mako, Formosa.

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USS Maddox (DD 731) off Mare Island Naval Shipyard, 3 January 1946. NHHC Photograph Collection, Visual-Aid Cards.

Jan. 21, 1954: USS Nautilus (SSN 571) was christened & launched

On January 21, 1954, the world’s first nuclear submarine, USS Nautilus (SSN-571) was christened and launched at Groton, Connecticut. Following commissioning in September, Nautilus remained dockside until 17 January 1955, when at, 11:00 her lines were cast and she was “underway on nuclear power.” Nautilus now serves as the historic submarine at the Submarine Force Museum at Groton.

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Submarine USS Nautilus (SSN-571). Undated artwork by John Landry. , NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 72609-KN

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USS Nautilus (SSN-571) on the ways at Groton, CT, Electric Boat Company. Artist: Arthur Beaumont. Sketched from life at Groton, November 1953, at request of Office of Information, US Navy. Gift of sponsor, Mrs. Dwight D. Eisenhowser. Courtesy of the Navy Art Collection, NH 93401-A KN (Color).

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USS Nautilus (SSN 571) being launched at Groton, Connecticut. NHHC Photograph Collection, L-File, Ships.

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USS Nautilus (SSN 571) being christened by Mrs. Dwight D. Eisenhower (First lady) at Groton, Connecticut. Note Commander Edward L. Beach in the background. NHHC Photograph Collection, L-File, Ships.

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USS Nautilus Christening Launches a Naval Warfare Revolution

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USS Nautilus (SSN 571), underway. NHHC Photograph Collection, L-File, Ships.

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USS Nautilus (SSN 571). Cover from the christening and launching on 21 January 1954. The cover is autographed by President, Vice President of the United States, the Postmaster General, and the Commanding Officer and Executive Officer of USS Nautilus. Donated by Mr. Harold J. Frankel, 1970. NHHC Photograph Collection: NH 72808.

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USS Nautilus (SSN-571) pamphlet, circa mid-1950s. NHHC Photograph Collection, L-File, Ships.

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USS Nautilus (SSN-571) pamphlet, circa mid-1950s. NHHC Photograph Collection, L-File, Ships.

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USS Nautilus (SSN-571) pamphlet, circa mid-1950s. NHHC Photograph Collection, L-File, Ships.

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USS Nautilus (SSN-571) pamphlet, circa mid-1950s. NHHC Photograph Collection, L-File, Ships.

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USS Nautilus (SSN-571) pamphlet, circa mid-1950s. NHHC Photograph Collection, L-File, Ships.

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USS Nautilus (SSN-571) pamphlet, circa mid-1950s. NHHC Photograph Collection, L-File, Ships.

Jan. 21, 1961: USS George Washington completed 1st patrol

On January 21, 1961, USS George Washington (SSBN 598) completed the first operational voyage of fleet ballistic missile submarine staying submerged 66 days.

USS George Washington (SSBN 598), flag ship of Commander Submarine Squadron 14 (ComSubRon 14), cruises into her home port, Holy Loch, Scotland, March 1968. NHHC Photograph Collection, L-File, Ships.

USS George Washington (SSBN 598), flag ship of Commander Submarine Squadron 14 (ComSubRon 14), cruises into her home port, Holy Loch, Scotland, March 1968. NHHC Photograph Collection, L-File, Ships.

USS George Washington (SSBN 598), underway, February 1974. NHHC Photograph Collection, L-File, Ships.

USS George Washington (SSBN 598), underway, February 1974. NHHC Photograph Collection, L-File, Ships.

USS George Washington (SSBN 598), has a Polaris missile canister lowered into one of her launching tubes at Charleston, South Carolina, Navy Pier, 15 November 1960. NHHC Photograph Collection, L-File, Ships.

USS George Washington (SSBN 598), has a Polaris missile canister lowered into one of her launching tubes at Charleston, South Carolina, Navy Pier, 15 November 1960. NHHC Photograph Collection, L-File, Ships.

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Military Monday – Retro Photos: US Navy Activity in WWII Pacific

Jan. 12, 1945: Task Force 38 aircraft target Japanese vessels

USS Hornet (CV-12)

USS Hornet (CV-12)

ABOVE: USS Hornet (CV-12). View looking aft from the ship’s island as she steams with other carriers during a western Pacific gunnery practice session, circa June 1945. Next ship astern is USS Bon Homme Richard (CV-31), firing her 5″/38 battery to starboard. Two small aircraft carriers (CVL) are beyond her. Note yellow flight deck markings on Hornet and TBM and SB2C aircraft parked aft. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives, 80-G-K-5702 (Color).

Also on 12 January 1945, near Cam Ranh Bay, submarine chaser Ch 43 and auxiliary minesweeper Otowa Maru are sunk; submarine chaser Ch 34 and freighter Ryuyo Maru are damaged. Near Saigon, landing ship T.140 and stores ship Ikutagawa Maru, army cargo ships Kiyo Maru and No.17 Shinsei Maru, freighters Kenei Maru and Taikyu Maru, along with tanker No.9 Horai Maru are sunk.

TF38s

TF38s

ABOVE: TBF Avenger aircraft of Air Group 4, USS Essex (CV-9) Task Group 38.3, leaving the coast of French Indo-China as they return to their carrier after strikes on the Saigon area, 12 January 1945. National Archives photograph, 80-G-300666.

Japanese vessels sunk were:

Antisubmarine sweeping ship (ex-training cruiser) Kashii; escort vessel Chiburi; Coast Defense Vessel No. 17; Coast Defense Vessel No.19; tankers Ayanami Maru, Hoei Maru, Akashi Maru, and Kumagawa Maru; and transport Shinsei Maru.

Coast Defense Vessel No. 23 and Coast Defense Vessel No. 51, transport Kembu Maru, Army cargo ships Yushu Maru and Kyokun Maru, tankers No.2 Nanryu Maru and Shoei Maru, and cargo ships Eiman Maru, Hotsusan Maru, Tatsuhato Maru, Otusasan Maru, Yujo Maru and No. 63 Banshu Maru are damaged. Landing ships T.149 and T.137, fleet tankers San Luis Maru and No.3 Kyoei Maru, escort vessels Daito and Ukuru and Coast Defense Vessel.27 are also damaged.

TF 38 planes also attacked convoy SASI 40. Army cargo ship France Maru, merchant tanker Shingi Maru, and guardboat No.2 Fushimi Maru are sunk off Vung Tau. Convoy SATA 05 came under attack by TF 38 planes below Cape Padaran. Submarine chaser Ch 31, minesweeper W.101, Patrol Boat No.03 (ex-U.S. minesweeper Finch (AM 9), Coast Defense Vessel No.35, Coast Defense Vessel No.43 and the ships they are escorting – tankers Tyahauki Maru, Nagoyoshi Maru, and transport Toyu Maru.

Admiral William F. Halsey, USN, and Vice Admiral John S. McCain, USN, circa January 1945. National Archives photograph, 80-G-165143.

Admiral William F. Halsey, USN, and Vice Admiral John S. McCain, USN, circa January 1945. National Archives photograph, 80-G-165143.

Jan. 12, 1944: US Navy Aircraft activity in the Pacific

Consolidated PBY5 “Catalina” view of Gunner manning waist machine gun, circa 1944. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 92491.

Consolidated PBY5 “Catalina” view of Gunner manning waist machine gun, circa 1944. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 92491.

Consolidated PB4Y-1 Bomber on patrol in the South Western Pacific area in 1943-44. This plane belonged to bombing squadron 106 (VB-106). Courtesy of Vice Admiral John T. Hayward, USN, (Retired). NHHC Photograph Collection: NH 75355.

Consolidated PB4Y-1 Bomber on patrol in the South Western Pacific area in 1943-44. This plane belonged to bombing squadron 106 (VB-106). Courtesy of Vice Admiral John T. Hayward, USN, (Retired). NHHC Photograph Collection: NH 75355.

Consolidated PBY-5 “Catalina” flying boat of a “Black Cat” night patrol squadron, in flight near the New Guinea Coast, May 1944. National Archives photograph, 80-G-1022359.

Consolidated PBY-5 “Catalina” flying boat of a “Black Cat” night patrol squadron, in flight near the New Guinea Coast, May 1944. National Archives photograph, 80-G-1022359.

Jan. 12, 1943: USS Guardfish sank Japanese Patrol Boat No.1

USS Guardfish (SS 217), ship’s insignia probably dates from WWII. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 67779-KN (Color).

USS Guardfish (SS 217), ship’s insignia probably dates from WWII. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 67779-KN (Color).

USS Guardfish (SS 217), serving as Naval Reserve Training Submarine at New London, Connecticut, circa the 1950s. Courtesy of D.M. McPherson, 1974. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 81356.

USS Guardfish (SS 217), serving as Naval Reserve Training Submarine at New London, Connecticut, circa the 1950s. Courtesy of D.M. McPherson, 1974. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 81356.

USS Guardfish (SS 217), serving as Naval Reserve Training Submarine at New London, Connecticut, circa the 1950s. Courtesy of D.M. McPherson, 1974. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 81356.

USS Guardfish (SS 217), serving as Naval Reserve Training Submarine at New London, Connecticut, circa the 1950s. Courtesy of D.M. McPherson, 1974. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 81356.

Jan. 13, 1943: US Navy Submarine activity in the Pacific

USS Triton (SS 201) photographed from a U.S. Navy blimp, July 1943. NHHC Photograph Collection, Visual-Aid Cards, Photographs.

USS Triton (SS 201) photographed from a U.S. Navy blimp, July 1943. NHHC Photograph Collection, Visual-Aid Cards, Photographs.

USS Whale (SS 239), photographed on 21 April 1945. Courtesy of D.M. McPherson, 1975. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 83206.

USS Whale (SS 239), photographed on 21 April 1945. Courtesy of D.M. McPherson, 1975. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 83206.

USS Triton (SS 201) photographed at Naval Air Station, Dutch Harbor, Alaska, July 1942. NHHC Photograph Collection, Visual-Aid Cards, Photographs.

USS Triton (SS 201) photographed at Naval Air Station, Dutch Harbor, Alaska, July 1942. NHHC Photograph Collection, Visual-Aid Cards, Photographs.

Jan. 13, 1943: PBY-5A Catalina Aircraft sank German Sub U-507

ARM3 R. H. Moore, USN, mans a .50 cal Machine Gun in a waist blister of a consolidated PBY-5 “Catalina” at Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida, 10 March 1944. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 92490.

ARM3 R. H. Moore, USN, mans a .50 cal Machine Gun in a waist blister of a consolidated PBY-5 “Catalina” at Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida, 10 March 1944. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 92490.

Consolidated PBY-5 or 5A “Catalina” Patrol Bomber. Waist gunner checks the sights of the plane’s starboard waist .50 Cal. Machine Gun, at extreme depression. Photograph released 20 September 1943. National Archives photograph, 80-G-43096.

Consolidated PBY-5 or 5A “Catalina” Patrol Bomber. Waist gunner checks the sights of the plane’s starboard waist .50 Cal. Machine Gun, at extreme depression. Photograph released 20 September 1943. National Archives photograph, 80-G-43096.

PBY-5s of Squadron VP-52, in flight, 10 February 1944. National Archives photograph, 80-G-223134.

PBY-5s of Squadron VP-52, in flight, 10 February 1944. National Archives photograph, 80-G-223134.

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