#WarriorWednesday: LCDR John Charles Waldron, USN (1900-1942)

Lieutenant Commander John Charles Waldron, USN, standing in front of a Douglas TBD-1 "Devastator" of Torpedo Squadron Eight, circa 1942.

Lieutenant Commander John Charles Waldron, USN, standing in front of a Douglas TBD-1 “Devastator” of Torpedo Squadron Eight, circa 1942.

Lt. Cmdr. John C. Waldron, CO of Torpedo Squadron 8, went directly into harms way by leading his unit of 15 planes toward a Japanese carrier group without fighter escort. His bravery and leadership changed the course of the Battle of Midway.

John C. Waldron was born at Fort Pierre, South Dakota, on 24 August 1900. Graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1924, he became a Naval Aviator in 1927. During the years prior to World War II, he served in several air units, was an instructor at the Naval Academy and at Pensacola, Florida, and performed other duties connected with aviation. In 1941, LCdr. Waldron became Commanding Officer of Torpedo Squadron Eight (VT-8), which was to serve on the new aircraft carrier Hornet (CV-8). He led that unit during the Battle of Midway, when all fifteen of its planes were lost to overwhelming enemy fighter opposition while making an unsupported attack on the Japanese aircraft carrier force. Lieutenant Commander John C. Waldron was killed during that action.

USS Waldron (DD-699) was named in honor of John Charles Waldron.

On the Web: 

Course to Midway – Torpedo Squadron 8 – U.S. Navy

Torpedo Squadron 8 (VT-8) 

A Dawn Like Thunder: The True Story of Torpedo Squadron8

Battle of Midway

USS Hornet (CV-8)

USS Waldron (DD-699)

TORPEDO SQUADRON 8 VT-8 – YouTube

Remembering Torpedo Squadron 8 and the Battle of Midway

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1 April 1893: Establishment of US Navy Chief Petty Officers

On Apr. 1, 1893, Chief Petty Officers were established by Navy General Order 409, which was authorized by an Executive Order by President Benjamin Harrison on Feb. 25, 1893. Navy Chiefs, come and “spin a yarn” about your proudest moment as a Chief.

List of Chiefs who received the Medal of Honor. Created and provided by ITCM Jim Leuci, USNR, for the MCPON's Block 39 program.

List of Chiefs who received the Medal of Honor. Created and provided by ITCM Jim Leuci, USNR, for the MCPON’s Block 39 program.

Female U.S. Navy chief and master chief petty officers (CPO) pose for a group photograph during the 115th birthday celebration of the CPO rank on board the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) in the Pacific Ocean April 1, 2008. The CPO is one of the oldest ranks in the Navy. Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group is conducting a composite training unit exercise in preparing for an upcoming deployment. Photographed by MC2 Joseph M. Buliavac. DOD Still Media Photograph: 080401-N-RC734-115

Female U.S. Navy chief and master chief petty officers (CPO) pose for a group photograph during the 115th birthday celebration of the CPO rank on board the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) in the Pacific Ocean April 1, 2008. The CPO is one of the oldest ranks in the Navy. Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group is conducting a composite training unit exercise in preparing for an upcoming deployment. Photographed by MC2 Joseph M. Buliavac. DOD Still Media Photograph: 080401-N-RC734-115

Chief Pharmacist’s Mate Louis Zeller, USN. He was a member of the crew of USS Christabel and patrolled off Brest, France during WWI. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross by Admiral Wilson. Zeller dove into water filled with burning exploding powder boxes from the Florence H to rescue badly burned seaman, managing to accomplish this within seconds of a severe explosion. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 63045.

Chief Pharmacist’s Mate Louis Zeller, USN. He was a member of the crew of USS Christabel and patrolled off Brest, France during WWI. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross by Admiral Wilson. Zeller dove into water filled with burning exploding powder boxes from the Florence H to rescue badly burned seaman, managing to accomplish this within seconds of a severe explosion. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 63045.

U.S. Navy Chief Logistics Specialist De'Andre Allen proctors the Navy-wide petty officer third class advancement exam at Commander, Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan, March 18, 2010. Test takers are given three hours to complete the exam, which consists of 200 multiple-choice question. Photographed by MC3 Charles Oki. Defense Still Media Photograph, 100318-N-2013O-006.

U.S. Navy Chief Logistics Specialist De’Andre Allen proctors the Navy-wide petty officer third class advancement exam at Commander, Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan, March 18, 2010. Test takers are given three hours to complete the exam, which consists of 200 multiple-choice question. Photographed by MC3 Charles Oki. Defense Still Media Photograph, 100318-N-2013O-006.

Chief Steward Yung Chin Chang, USN. Chief Chang, a Chinese-American, enlisted in the 1930s and served during World War II. His hometown was Hangkow, and he served on board USS Luzon (ARG-2). He also served on Guam and Oahu, Hawaii. During World War II, he was also a Prisoner of War at Cavite, Philippines. Donation of Mr. Jim Huen, 2009. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 106868-KN (Color).

Chief Steward Yung Chin Chang, USN. Chief Chang, a Chinese-American, enlisted in the 1930s and served during World War II. His hometown was Hangkow, and he served on board USS Luzon (ARG-2). He also served on Guam and Oahu, Hawaii. During World War II, he was also a Prisoner of War at Cavite, Philippines. Donation of Mr. Jim Huen, 2009. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 106868-KN (Color).

Chief Aviation Ordnanceman John William Finn, USN. Who was awarded the Medal of Honor for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service during the 7 December 1941 Japanese air attack on Naval Air Station Kanoehe Bay, Oahu, T.H. He is wearing the medal in this photograph. Halftone reproduction, copied from the official publication "Medal of Honor, 1861-1948, The Navy", page 183.

Chief Aviation Ordnanceman John William Finn, USN. Who was awarded the Medal of Honor for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service during the 7 December 1941 Japanese air attack on Naval Air Station Kanoehe Bay, Oahu, T.H. He is wearing the medal in this photograph.
Halftone reproduction, copied from the official publication “Medal of Honor, 1861-1948, The Navy”, page 183.

John Henry ("Dick") Turpin, Chief Gunner's Mate, USN (retired) (1876-1962). One of the first African-American Chief Petty Officers in the U.S. Navy. This photograph appears to have been taken during or after World War II. Turpin enlisted in the Navy in 1896. A survivor of the explosions on USS Maine (1898) and USS Bennington (1905), he became a Chief Gunner's Mate in 1917. Transferred to the Fleet Reserve in 1919, CGM Turpin retired in 1925. Qualified as a Master Diver, he was also employed as a Master Rigger at the Puget Sound Navy Yard, and, during the World War II era, made inspirational visits to Navy Training Centers and defense plants. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 89471.

John Henry (“Dick”) Turpin, Chief Gunner’s Mate, USN (retired) (1876-1962). One of the first African-American Chief Petty Officers in the U.S. Navy. This photograph appears to have been taken during or after World War II. Turpin enlisted in the Navy in 1896. A survivor of the explosions on USS Maine (1898) and USS Bennington (1905), he became a Chief Gunner’s Mate in 1917. Transferred to the Fleet Reserve in 1919, CGM Turpin retired in 1925. Qualified as a Master Diver, he was also employed as a Master Rigger at the Puget Sound Navy Yard, and, during the World War II era, made inspirational visits to Navy Training Centers and defense plants. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 89471.

Chief Boatswain's Mate John MacKenzie, USNRF. Wearing the Medal of Honor he received in recognition of his heroism in securing a depth charge that had come adrift on board USS Remlik (SP-157) during a heavy gale on 17 December 1917. Collection of Chief Boatswain's Mate John MacKenzie, USNRF. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 98032.

Chief Boatswain’s Mate John MacKenzie, USNRF. Wearing the Medal of Honor he received in recognition of his heroism in securing a depth charge that had come adrift on board USS Remlik (SP-157) during a heavy gale on 17 December 1917. Collection of Chief Boatswain’s Mate John MacKenzie, USNRF. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 98032.

Chiefs! USS Pennsylvania (BB-38). View of seven veteran chief petty officers, circa 1941. (left to right): Chief Gunner's Mate Louie Warner; Chief Boatswain's Mate Frederick Heintz; Chief Quartermaster Joseph Wagster; Chief John Wilson; Chief Boatswain's Mate Robert Hernlen; Chief Steward Alexander Siewart; and Chief Fire Controlman Samuel Kronberger. Note 14"/45 Cal. Guns and Vought OS2U "Kingfisher" on catapault in background. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 51890.

Chiefs! USS Pennsylvania (BB-38). View of seven veteran chief petty officers, circa 1941. (left to right): Chief Gunner’s Mate Louie Warner; Chief Boatswain’s Mate Frederick Heintz; Chief Quartermaster Joseph Wagster; Chief John Wilson; Chief Boatswain’s Mate Robert Hernlen; Chief Steward Alexander Siewart; and Chief Fire Controlman Samuel Kronberger. Note 14″/45 Cal. Guns and Vought OS2U “Kingfisher” on catapault in background. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 51890.

USS Squalus (SS-192) Rescue and Salvage Operations, 1939. Secretary of the Navy Charles Edison presents Medals of Honor to four men for heroism during rescue and salvage operations following the accidental sinking of Squalus on 23 May 1939. The ceremonies took place at the Navy Department on 19 January 1940. The men are (from left to right): Chief Machinist's Mate William Badders; Chief Torpedoman John Mihalowski; Chief Boatswain's Mate Orson L. Crandall; and Chief Metalsmith James Harper McDonald. All were qualified as Divers. The Diver's distinguishing mark is visible on the Mihalowski's and Crandall's jacket sleeves. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 57887.

USS Squalus (SS-192) Rescue and Salvage Operations, 1939. Secretary of the Navy Charles Edison presents Medals of Honor to four men for heroism during rescue and salvage operations following the accidental sinking of Squalus on 23 May 1939. The ceremonies took place at the Navy Department on 19 January 1940.
The men are (from left to right):
Chief Machinist’s Mate William Badders;
Chief Torpedoman John Mihalowski;
Chief Boatswain’s Mate Orson L. Crandall; and
Chief Metalsmith James Harper McDonald.
All were qualified as Divers. The Diver’s distinguishing mark is visible on the Mihalowski’s and Crandall’s jacket sleeves. NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 57887.

PHC William J. Murtha, USN. Portrait inscribed to the donor, “To a real pal and shipmate. One that I’ll never forget. From Bill Murtha, circa 1944. Courtesy of PHC John Highfill, USN, (Retired). NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 94867.

PHC William J. Murtha, USN. Portrait inscribed to the donor, “To a real pal and shipmate. One that I’ll never forget. From Bill Murtha, circa 1944. Courtesy of PHC John Highfill, USN, (Retired). NHHC Photograph Collection, NH 94867.

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Remembrance, Honor, Tribute: 01 Feb 2003 – The Loss of Shuttle Columbia [STS-107]

STS-107 INSIGNIA -- This is the insignia for STS-107, which is a multi-discipline microgravity and Earth science research mission with a multitude of international scientific investigations conducted continuously during the planned 16 days on orbit. The central element of the patch is the microgravity symbol flowing into the rays of the astronaut symbol. The mission inclination is portrayed by the 39-degree angle of the astronaut symbol to the Earth's horizon. The sunrise is representative of the numerous experiments that are the dawn of a new era for continued microgravity research on the International Space Station and beyond. The breadth of science conducted on this mission will have widespread benefits to life on Earth and our continued exploration of space, illustrated by the Earth and stars. The constellation Columba (the dove) was chosen to symbolize peace on Earth and the Space Shuttle Columbia. The seven stars also represent the mission crew members and honor the original astronauts who paved the way to make research in space possible. The Israeli flag is adjacent to the name of the payload specialist who is the first person from that country to fly on the Space Shuttle.  Image: NASA History Office

STS-107 INSIGNIA — This is the insignia for STS-107, which is a multi-discipline microgravity and Earth science research mission with a multitude of international scientific investigations conducted continuously during the planned 16 days on orbit. The central element of the patch is the microgravity symbol flowing into the rays of the astronaut symbol. The mission inclination is portrayed by the 39-degree angle of the astronaut symbol to the Earth’s horizon. The sunrise is representative of the numerous experiments that are the dawn of a new era for continued microgravity research on the International Space Station and beyond. The breadth of science conducted on this mission will have widespread benefits to life on Earth and our continued exploration of space, illustrated by the Earth and stars. The constellation Columba (the dove) was chosen to symbolize peace on Earth and the Space Shuttle Columbia. The seven stars also represent the mission crew members and honor the original astronauts who paved the way to make research in space possible. The Israeli flag is adjacent to the name of the payload specialist who is the first person from that country to fly on the Space Shuttle.
Image: NASA History Office

On February 1, 2003 after 16 days in orbit and during the re-entry phase into Earth’s atmosphere the Shuttle Columbia disintegrated and was lost with all hands due to a failure in the shuttle heat shield protective system on the leading edge of the left wing.

The accident was later determined to have been caused by a piece of insulating foam that dislodged from the external tank during launch and striking the fragile carbon-carbon leading edge compromising the heat shield protective system.

The crew was awarded the Congressional Space MOH posthumously.

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The STS-107 crew, from the left, Mission Specialist David Brown, Commander Rick Husband, Mission Specialists Laurel Clark, Kalpana Chawla and Michael Anderson, Pilot William McCool and Payload Specialist Ilan Ramon. (NASA photo)

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Inside an Orbiter Processing Facility bay, Space Shuttle Columbia is readied for its move to the Vehicle Assembly Building. The orbiter is being prepared to fly on mission STS-107 now targeted for no earlier than Jan. 16, 2003. The STS-107 mission will be dedicated to microgravity research. The payloads include the Hitchhiker Bridge, a carrier for the Fast Reaction Experiments Enabling Science, Technology, Applications and Research (FREESTAR) incorporating eight high priority secondary attached Shuttle experiments, and the SHI Research Double Module (SHI/RDM), also known as SPACEHAB. (Photo Release Date: 11/20/2002 )

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Space Shuttle Columbia rolls out from the Vehicle Assembly Building on its way to Launch Pad 39A. Columbia sits atop the Mobile Launcher Platform, which in turn is carried by the crawler-transporter underneath for the long, slow journey to the pad. The STS-107 research mission comprises experiments ranging from material sciences to life sciences (many rats), plus the Fast Reaction Experiments Enabling Science, Technology, Applications and Research (FREESTAR) that incorporates eight high priority secondary attached shuttle experiments. Mission STS-107 is scheduled to launch Jan. 16, 2003. (Photo Release Date: 12/09/2002 )

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(01/16/2003) — KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. – Trailing a twisting column of smoke, Space Shuttle Columbia hurtles toward space on mission STS-107. Following a flawless and uneventful countdown, liftoff occurred on-time at 10:39 a.m. EST. The 16-day research mission will include FREESTAR (Fast Reaction Experiments Enabling Science, Technology, Applications and Research) and the SHI Research Double Module (SHI/RDM), known as SPACEHAB. Experiments on the module range from material sciences to life sciences. Landing is scheduled at about 8:53 a.m. EST on Saturday, Feb. 1. This mission is the first Shuttle mission of 2003. Mission STS-107 is the 28th flight of the orbiter Columbia and the 113th flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program.

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(01/16/2003) — KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. – Trailing a twisting column of smoke, Space Shuttle Columbia hurtles toward space on mission STS-107. Following a flawless and uneventful countdown, liftoff occurred on-time at 10:39 a.m. EST. The 16-day research mission will include FREESTAR (Fast Reaction Experiments Enabling Science, Technology, Applications and Research) and the SHI Research Double Module (SHI/RDM), known as SPACEHAB. Experiments on the module range from material sciences to life sciences. Landing is scheduled at about 8:53 a.m. EST on Saturday, Feb. 1. This mission is the first Shuttle mission of 2003. Mission STS-107 is the 28th flight of the orbiter Columbia and the 113th flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program.

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Astronaut Rick D. Husband, Colonel, USAF, Mission Commander.

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Astronaut William C. McCool, CDR, USN, Shuttle Pilot.
“From our orbital vantage point, we observe an earth without borders, full of peace, beauty and magnificence, and we pray that humanity as a whole can imagine a borderless world as we see it and strive to live as one in peace.”

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Astronaut David M. Brown, Captain, USN, Mission Specialist.

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Astronaut Laurel B. Clark, Captain, USN, Mission Specialist.

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Ilan Ramon (Colonel, Israel Air Force)
Payload Specialist representing the Israel Space Agency (ISA).

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Astronaut Michael P. Anderson, Lt. Colonel, USAF, Payload Commander.

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Astronaut Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D, Mission Specialist.

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(25 July 2002) — The STS-107 crewmembers pose for an informal crew portrait near a T-38 trainer jet at Ellington Field near Johnson Space Center (JSC). From the left are astronauts Rick D. Husband, mission commander; William C. McCool, pilot; David M. Brown, Laurel B. Clark, both mission specialists; payload specialist Ilan Ramon; astronauts Michael P. Anderson and Kalpana Chawla, both mission specialists. Ramon represents the Israeli Space Agency.

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Columbia STS-107 Crew Training in Building 9NW. View of STS-107 crew members posing for photo at the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility (SVMF). From the left are Ilan Ramon, Payload Specialist; William C. McCool, Pilot; along with David M. Brown and Kalpana Chawla, both Mission Specialists (MS); Michael P. Anderson, Payload Commander; Laurel B. Clark, MS; and Rick D. Husband, Mission Commander.
NASA Identifier: JSC2001-02464 Public Domain

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Columbia STS-107 Crew Training in Building 9NW. View of Astronauts Rick D. Husband (left) and William C. McCool, STS-107 mission commander and pilot, respectively, give a thumbs-up as they await a training session in one of the trainer/mockups (out of frame) in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility (SVMF). Husband and McCool are wearing Launch and Entry Suits (LES).
NASA Identifier: JSC2001-02451 Public Domain

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(10 June 2002) — The STS-107 crewmembers, along with Stephanie Turner (center) of the United Space Alliance (USA), pause from their mission training for a cake cutting ceremony in the Jake Garn Simulation and Training Facility at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). From left are astronauts Laurel B. Clark, Kalpana Chawla, both mission specialists; William C. McCool, pilot; Rick D. Husband, mission commander; David M. Brown, Michael P. Anderson, both mission specialists; and Ilan Ramon, payload specialist representing the Israeli Space Agency.

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(20 January 2003) — Three STS-107 crewmembers are pictured prior to their sleep shift in bunk beds on the middeck of the Space Shuttle Columbia. From the left are astronauts Laurel B. Clark, mission specialist; Rick D. Husband, mission commander; and Kalpana Chawla, mission specialist. Husband, Clark, Chawla, and payload specialist Ilan Ramon (out of frame) were members of the Red shift team. Ramon represents the Israeli Space Agency.

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(22 January 2003) — One of the crew members aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia used a digital still camera to capture a sunrise from the crew cabin during Flight Day 7.

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(22 January 2003) — This heavy cloud cover typifies most of the out-the-window scenes witnessed by the STS-107 crew as it orbited Earth aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia on Flight Day 7.
NASA Photo

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Earth Observations taken during Shuttle Columbia’s last mission STS-107
NASA Identifier: s107e05801 Public Domain

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Spacehab RDM in Columbia’s PLB backdropped by Earth’s limb during STS-107
The Spacehab SHResearch Double Module RDM with Spacehab logo is visible in orbiter Columbia’s OV-102 payload bay PLB backdropped against a glowing blue illuminated edge of the Earth’s limb. On the roof of the SH is the Star Navigator STARNAV, Miniature Satellite Threat Reporting System MSTRS, and Combined Two-Phase Loop Experiment COM2PLEX payloads. Visible in the aft section of the PLB is upper portion of the Extended Duration Orbiter EDO pallet.
NASA Identifier: s107e05310 Public Domain

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Columbia STS107 (16 January to 1 February 2003) —
This picture was on a roll of unprocessed film later recovered by searchers from the orbiter debris.
The STS-107 crewmembers strike a flying pose for their traditional in-flight crew portrait in the SPACEHAB Research Double Module (RDM) aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. From the left (bottom row), wearing red shirts to signify their shift’s color, are astronauts Kalpana Chawla, mission specialist; Rick D. Husband, mission commander; Laurel B. Clark, mission specialist; and Ilan Ramon, payload specialist. From the left (top row), wearing blue shirts, are astronauts David M. Brown, mission specialist; William C. McCool, pilot; and Michael P. Anderson, payload commander. Ramon represents the Israeli Space Agency.
NASA Identifier: HSF-photo-sts107-735-032 Public Domain

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Spacehab in Columbia’s PLB backdropped against the Earth during STS-107
The Spacehab SH Research Double Module RDM with Spacehab logo is visible in orbiter Columbia’s OV-102 payload bay PLB backdropped against the Earth. On the roof of the SH is the Star Navigator STARNAV, Miniature Satellite Threat Reporting System MSTRS, and Combined Two-Phase Loop Experiment COM2PLEX payloads. Visible in the aft section of the PLB is upper portion of the Extended Duration Orbiter EDO pallet.
NASA Identifier: s107e05712 Public Domain

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MCC at the Johnson Space Center,
at the moment flight controllers began losing
telemetry and radio transmissions from the Space Shuttle Columbia.
Note red indicators on screen.
At approximately the same moment NASA broadcast on NASA TV:
“MCC-Commentator: “Columbia’s altitude 48 statute miles as it begins the first in a series of four banks to dissipate speed as it descends into the atmosphere, banking to the right now, a steep bank of 60 degrees and approaching the west coast of the United States. Columbia’s speed 16,620 miles per hour, range to touchdown at the Kennedy Space Center runway 3,450 statute miles.”

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(1 February 2003) — In memory of the Space Shuttle Columbia crewmembers who lost their lives on February 1, 2003, a massive collection of flowers, balloons, flags, signs, and other arrangements were placed at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) sign at the main entrance to the center.

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(4 February 2003) — PN2 Stephen Escalante (USNR) and the United States Navy Band Sea Chanters are pictured during the tolling of the bells at the memorial for the Columbia astronauts on the mall of the Johnson Space Center.

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Columbia Tribute
This is a printable version of space shuttle Columbia’s orbiter tribute, or OV-102, which hangs in Firing Room 4 of the Launch Control Center at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The tribute features Columbia, the ”first of the fleet,” rising above Earth at the dawn of the Space Shuttle Program. Columbia’s accomplishments include the launch and deployment of NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory on STS-93, the first shuttle landing at White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico on STS-3, the first deployment of commercial satellites and the first four-member crew during STS-5, the first Spacelab mission and first six-member crew on STS-9, the first female commander, Eileen Collins, on STS-93, as well as several laboratory missions with international partners. Crew-designed patches for each of Columbia’s missions lead from Earth toward a remembrance of the STS-107 crew, which was lost during re-entry on Feb. 1, 2003. Five orbiter tributes are on display in the firing room, representing Atlantis, Challenger, Columbia, Endeavour and Discovery. Graphic design credit: NASA/Amy Lombardo. NASA publication number: SP-2010-08-163-KSC
NASA Identifier: 483257main_2columbia Public Domain

Always remember the bravery of this courageous crew! Heroes, every single one.

On the Web:

Columbia crew bios on the NASA JSC Website:
www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/husband.html
www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/mccool.html
www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/brown.html
www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/PS/ramon.html
www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/anderson.html
www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/chawla.html
www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/clark.html

Learn more about Columbia, her mission and her crew:
www.nasa.gov/pdf/2222main_STS-107_PK.pdf

From NASA HD channel on YouTube:
STS-107 Columbia Debris Strike and Foam Strike Tests:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=IgQ3ekcvyRA

View the Columbia Accident Investigation Report (CAIB)
on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration – NASAwebsite:
www.nasa.gov/columbia/caib/html/start.html

From the NASA History Office: Remembering Columbia STS 107:
http://history.nasa.gov/columbia/index.html

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USS Guadalcanal – 09 April 1944

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On 9 April 1944, TBMs and FM-2s (VC 58) from USS Guadalcanal (CVE 60) together with USS Pillsbury (DE 133), USS Pope (DE 134), USS Flahetry (DE 135), and USS Chatelain (DE 149) sank German submarine U 515 off Madeira Island.
On The Web: Learn more about USS Guadalcanal –
http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/g9/guadalcanal-i.htm &  9 April 1944 : US Navy sank German Submarine U-515 (9 photos)

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